‘Big Bang Theory’ exits TV airwaves with emotional episode | TribLIVE.com
Movies/TV

‘Big Bang Theory’ exits TV airwaves with emotional episode

Associated Press
1170691_web1_1170691-380c99e0e0684c26829d566c8a034935
Michael Yarish | CBS
This photo provided by CBS shows Jim Parsons in a scene from the series finale of ‘The Big Bang Theory,’ Thursday, May 16, 2019.
1170691_web1_1170691-7720e89ee60346d7b4667c496a5bc112
Michael Yarish | CBS
This photo provided by CBS shows Melissa Rauch, from left, Simon Helberg, Johnny Galecki, Kaley Cuoco, Jim Parsons, Mayim Bialik and Kunal Nayyar in a scene from the series finale of ‘The Big Bang Theory,’ Thursday, May 16, 2019.
1170691_web1_1170691-23b1bef04a9644fe87a42a6f02287de0
Michael Yarish | CBS
This photo provided by CBS shows Johnny Galecki, from left, Jim Parsons and Mayim Bialik in a scene from the series finale of ‘The Big Bang Theory,’ Thursday, May 16, 2019.
1170691_web1_1170691-18707c64754740689e5fd95deca037c6
Michael Yarish | CBS
This photo provided by CBS shows Mayim Bialik, left, and Jim Parsons, center, in a scene from the series finale of ‘The Big Bang Theory,’ Thursday, May 16, 2019.

LOS ANGELES — “The Big Bang Theory” closed out its run as television’s top-rated comedy with an emotional final episode that saw some big changes for the show’s group of geeky misfits.

The long-running series on CBS concluded with two final episodes, “The Change Constant” and “The Stockholm Syndrome,” in an hour-long finale Thursday evening. The series exited the TV airwaves with the most episodes for a multi-camera series ever with 279 episodes. It edged past NBC’s “Cheers,” which aired for 11 seasons and 275 episodes.

“The Big Bang Theory” debuted in 2007 and overcame early doubts to become a cult classic after some questioned the show’s chances of survival. The show was led by a crew of nerdy misfits starring Jim Parsons, Kaley Cuoco, Johnny Galecki, Mayim Bialik, Simon Helberg, Kunal Nayyar and Melissa Rauch.

Thursday’s finale was followed by a behind-the-scenes look at the show in “Unraveling the Mystery: A Big Bang Farewell” with Galecki and Cuoco as hosts.

The series began about geeky physicist roommates portrayed by Parsons and Galecki and expanded to include their friends, girlfriends and then wives. It inevitably made being nerds and comic book lovers a cool phenomenon in pop culture.

During its tenure, “Big Bang Theory” won 10 Emmy Awards. Parsons took home four of those trophies, including lead actor in a comedy series in 2014.

The final episodes were filled with a few surprises, a pregnancy, cameos and a speech about the importance of friendship in the series’ emotional conclusion.

Parson’s character Sheldon and Bialik’s Amy anxiously awaited the decision on whether the married couple would win the Noble Prize. The final episode also highlighted the fate of the broken elevator, which has been nonfunctional for much of the series.

It included a scene in which Bialik, who is a neuroscientist in real life, urges young girls to pursue careers in science. “Little girls who dream about science” should pursue it as a career and ignore naysayers, she said.

The comedy leaves on a high as one of television’s most popular shows. Last week’s episode was the most-watched program on broadcast or cable TV with 12.5 million viewers, beating out HBO’s “Game of Thrones,” which ends its series on Sunday after an eight-year run.

Parsons had said the end of the series feels like a “real rite of passage moment,” which was full of memories and some tears. Galecki said the show has touched “so many hearts.”

Categories: AandE | Movies TV | Top Stories
TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.