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Coffee cup in ‘Game of Thrones’ scene perks up viewers | TribLIVE.com
Movies/TV

Coffee cup in ‘Game of Thrones’ scene perks up viewers

Associated Press
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AP
This image released by HBO shows Kristofer Hivju, from left, Kit Harington and Emilia Clarke in a scene from “Game of Thrones.” fans got a taste of the modern world when eagle-eyed viewers spotted a takeout coffee cup on the table during a celebration in which the actors drank from goblets and horns. The characters Daenerys and Jon did not react to the out of place cup in Sunday’s episode. Many viewers complained the show should have caught the gaffe, which turned into an enduring meme on Monday.
1124076_web1_1124076-5efe249c5aca4de9a4b80a566ffe490d
AP
This image released by HBO shows from left, Nathalie Emmanuel, Emilia Clarke and Conleth Hill in a scene from “Game of Thrones,” that aired Sunday, May 5, 2019. In the third to last episode of HBO’s “Game of Thrones,” Mother of Dragons Daenerys Targaryen is suffering from a crisis of confidence. She is short on troops and dragons, short on strategies and short on friends. And her claim to the Iron Throne has weakened upon learning that Jon Snow, in fact, shares her royal Targaryen blood.

LOS ANGELES — “Game of Thrones” fans got a taste of the modern world when eagle-eyed viewers spotted a takeout coffee cup on the table during a celebration in which the actors drank from goblets and horns.

The characters Daenerys and Jon did not react to the out of place cup in Sunday’s episode.

Thrones-Coffee-Cup
HBO

Many viewers complained the show should have caught the gaffe, which turned into an enduring meme on Monday.

HBO poked fun at the oversight: “The latte that appeared in the episode was a mistake. Daenerys had ordered an herbal tea.”

Amateur sleuths tried to determine where the coffee cup came from, with But some viewers who took to Twitter concluding it was from Starbucks. HBO only said it was from its craft services crew.

Even the show’s executive producer, Bernie Caulfield, expressed disbelief that the cup made it on screen.

“Our onset prop people and decorators are so on it, 1,000%,” she said in an interview with Alison Stewart on WNYC’s “All of it.”

“Nowadays you can’t believe what you see because people can put things into a photo that really doesn’t exist, but I guess maybe it was there, I’m not sure,” she said. “We’re sorry!”

She also joked that Westeros was the first place to actually have a Starbucks: “It’s a little known fact.”

The last “Game of Thrones” episode airs May 19.

Categories: AandE | Movies TV
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