‘Game of Thrones’ finale leaves fans burned out, disappointed | TribLIVE.com
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‘Game of Thrones’ finale leaves fans burned out, disappointed

Jonna Miller
1182213_web1_gtr-GOTphotos2-020819
Helen Sloan/HBO
Jon Snow (Kit Harington) and Daenaerys Targaryen (Emilia Clarke), in a promotional photo for the final season of HBO’s blockbuster fantasy drama, “Game of Thrones.”

Be advised — there will be spoilers.

“Game of Thrones” came to the end of the line with Sunday’s series finale — enter into the unending winter of discontent. Longtime fans have been beset with goofs, gaffes and disappointment this season and the finale was no exception.

From the Washington Post: Forty-three minutes into Sunday’s “Game of Thrones” series finale, Queen Daenerys was dead, Drogon turned the Iron Throne to melted metal and someone left a plastic water bottle in King’s Landing.

Viewers spotted the non-medieval container hiding inside the King’s Landing amphitheater behind a boot worn by Samwell Tarly, who was set on resolving the problems, and future, of Westeros.

The water bottle represented a final blunder in a season inundated with errors — three weeks ago the Battle of Winterfell was plagued with darkness, and then there was the disposable coffee cup left on set.

Once again, HBO’s oversight swamped social media feeds.

“THE WATER BOTTLE,” one viewer tweeted. “THIS IS NOT EVEN FUNNY ANYMORE.”

Another GoT fan wrote, “So water bottles are a common thing in Westeros.”

Some fans felt Sunday’s episode, aptly titled “The Iron Throne,” represented a final flaw in a too-rushed, poorly written eighth and final season.

From CNN: Grief-stricken and thoroughly done with humanity, Drogon scoops up Daenerys’ dead body and flies off with her like she’s the baton in a relay race. That’s it. There’s no more dragon. There’s no more war. But there’s still 50 minutes worth of story left to tell. The “Game of Thrones” is dead. Welcome to the “Game of Sensible, Neatly Arranged Chairs.”

As one viewer wrote, “They aren’t even trying at this point.”

There was at least one high point to the final episode.

Jonna Miller is a Tribune-Review features editor. You can contact Jonna at 724-850-1270, [email protected] or via Twitter .

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