Illegal or just immoral? Film explores texting suicide case | TribLIVE.com
Movies/TV

Illegal or just immoral? Film explores texting suicide case

Associated Press
1359164_web1_1359164-51be9e29c2b146c994633d4a7be0a222
Bristol County Sheriff’s Office via AP
FILE - This Feb. 11, 2019, booking photo released by the Bristol County Sheriff’s Office shows Michelle Carter, convicted for sending a barrage of text messages urging boyfriend Conrad Roy III to kill himself. Roy took his own life in Fairhaven, Mass., in July 2014. A new HBO documentary that explores the case premiers on July 9.

A new documentary asks whether a young woman who sent her suicidal boyfriend countless text messages encouraging him to take his own life should be behind bars as a convicted criminal.

HBO’s “I Love You, Now Die: The Commonwealth V. Michelle Carter” digs into the unique case against the now-22-year-old found guilty of involuntary manslaughter in the death of Conrad Roy III.

Director Erin Lee Carr says she wants viewers to serve as Carter’s jury and decide whether her actions were criminal. Carter opted for a bench trial, which means a judge decided her fate.

The two-part documentary explores the legal case against Carter, the teens’ twisted relationship and Carter’s own mental health issues.

Part one debuts July 9.

Her lawyers are expected to appeal her case to the U.S. Supreme Court this month.

Categories: AandE | Movies TV
TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.