‘Jane the Virgin’ creator says finale should bring closure and other TV scoops | TribLIVE.com
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‘Jane the Virgin’ creator says finale should bring closure and other TV scoops

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Bryan Cranston attends the 2018 Performer Peer Group Celebration at NeueHouse Hollywood in Los Angeles. Cranston will star in a new TV legal thriller set in New Orleans. Showtime said Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019, that Cranston will play the lead role in “Your Honor,” a limited series from executive producers Robert and Michelle King of “The Good Wife” and “The Good Fight” and Peter Moffat.
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Jennifer Beals arrives at the premiere of “The Book of Eli” in Los Angeles. Showtime will air a sequel to its groundbreaking drama series “The L Word,” which explored lesbian and bisexual life in Los Angeles. Beals, Katherine Moennig and Leisha Hailey, stars of the original 2004-09 series, will reprise their roles, Showtime said Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019.
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Claire Danes attends the “Homeland” FYC Event at the Writers Guild Theater in Beverly Hills, Calif. “Homeland” fans will have to wait longer than expected for the start of the last season. Showtime said that the drama’s planned return in June has been pushed back to fall. The complexity of production is the reason for the season-eight delay, Showtime entertainment president Gary Levine said Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019.
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Wikimedia Commons
“Jane the Virgin” starring Gina Ridriguez, begins its final season March 27.

PASADENA, Calif. (AP) — A roundup of news from the Television Critics Association winter meeting, at which TV networks and streaming services are presenting details on upcoming programs.

Tissues, please

The upcoming final season of “Jane the Virgin” is already drawing tears.

The CW show’s creator, Jennie Snyder Urman, said she’s crying in the editing room as she works on the concluding episodes of the show starring Gina Rodriguez.

The producer and actress grew emotional discussing the telenovela-style comedy-drama Thursday with TV critics. They were asked how they would look back on “Jane the Virgin.”

“How much representation matters, what it feels like to be seen,” Urman said of the show focused on a Latino family, a rarity on TV.

Rodriguez said the audience response affirmed her belief that young girls would be empowered seeing a Latina character. She’s encouraged to increase her influence through directing and producing, she said.

As for the final episode, Urman said she’s intent on providing “a real sense of closure.” She said she’s feeling pressure to say goodbye in the right way and wants to “stick the landing.”

The fifth season of “Jane the Virgin,” which begins March 27, has much to resolve. Last season closed with Jane, who’s contemplating marriage to Rafael (Justin Baldoni), learning that her late husband Michael (Brett Dier) may have made a miraculous comeback.

The mystery of Michael’s apparent return will be explored in early episodes of season five, which will conclude this summer. The finale date has yet to be announced.

There may be a spinoff, a telenovela anthology series with Rodriguez and Urman serving as executive producers. CW has ordered a pilot for series consideration, with cast members yet to be announced. Rodriguez will be heard if not seen on it, narrating stories based on fictional novels written by her “Jane the Virgin” character.

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Cranston is ‘Your Honor’

Bryan Cranston will star in a new TV legal thriller set in New Orleans.

Showtime said this week that Cranston will play the lead role in “Your Honor,” a limited series from executive producers Robert and Michelle King of “The Good Wife” and “The Good Fight” and Peter Moffat.

Cranston, who’s also producing, portrays a respected judge whose son is involved in a hit-and-run accident. It becomes the catalyst for what Showtime called “a high-stakes game of lies, deceit and impossible choices.”

Production on the 10-episode series will begin later this year in New Orleans, the cable channel said. A debut date for “Your Honor” was not announced.

Cranston, who starred in “Breaking Bad,” is appearing on Broadway in “Network,” an adaptation of the 1976 film.

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Beals is back

Showtime will air a sequel to its groundbreaking drama series “The L Word,” which explored lesbian and bisexual life in Los Angeles.

Jennifer Beals, Katherine Moennig and Leisha Hailey, stars of the original 2004-09 series, will reprise their roles, Showtime said Thursday.

The sequel will introduce other characters across the sexual and gender spectrum, the channel said. It also will explore new and old neighborhoods throughout L.A., Showtime entertainment president Gary Levine said Thursday.

Production is set to begin this summer on eight episodes that the cable channel aims to air later this year, Levine said.

Original series creator Ilene Chaiken will be the executive producer, along with Marja-Lewis Ryan.

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Waiting game

“Homeland” fans will have to wait longer than expected for the start of the last season.

Showtime said that the drama’s planned return in June has been pushed back to fall.

The complexity of production is the reason for the season-eight delay, Showtime entertainment president Gary Levine said Wednesday.

Claire Danes stars in “Homeland,” which has taken her bipolar, now former CIA agent Carrie through dangerous conflicts that sometimes mirrored real-world events.

Last year, Carrie struggled to uncover an international conspiracy trying to harm America’s democratic institutions and was reunited with her mentor, Saul, played by Mandy Patinkin.

Showtime previously announced that the series, which debuted in 2011, will wrap with a 12-episode season.

A specific fall debut date wasn’t announced.


Lynn Elber is an Associated Press television writer.


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