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Thoughtful Thursdays Film Festival at UPG to address social issues | TribLIVE.com
Movies/TV

Thoughtful Thursdays Film Festival at UPG to address social issues

Shirley McMarlin
1124619_web1_gtr-liv-diversityfilms-050819
Charles Sykes/Invision/AP
Ryan Gosling stars in “Lars and the Real Girl,” the first showing in Westmoreland Diversity Coalition’s Thoughtful Thursdays Film Festival. Here, the actor attends the 2018 premiere of “First Man” at the National Air and Space Museum of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.

“Movies With a Message” is the theme of the upcoming Thoughtful Thursdays Film Festival hosted by the Westmoreland Diversity Coalition.

Screenings will begin at 6 p.m. in the Campana Chapel at the University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg, 150 Finoli Drive, Hempfield. A discussion on a pertinent social issue will follow each of the four movies.

The schedule includes:

Lars and the Real Girl, May 9 — The shy title character (Ryan Gosling) announces that he has a new girlfriend, but she turns out to be a life-size plastic woman. Following the advice of a doctor, his family and the rest of the community go along with his delusion. Rated PG-13, 2007.

Presented in partnership with Westmoreland County Behavioral Health and Mental Health America of Westmoreland.

• Milk, June 13 — In 1977, Harvey Milk (Sean Penn) becomes the nation’s first openly gay man elected to a notable public office when he wins a seat on the San Francisco Board of Supervisors. Rated R, 2008.

Presented in partnership with PFLAG Greensburg and Westmoreland LGBTQ Interfaith Network.

• Finding Forrester, July 11 — An eccentric, reclusive novelist (Sean Connery) and a young, gifted African American scholar-athlete (Rob Brown) develop an unlikely friendship. Rated PG-13, 2000.

Presented in partnership with the YWCA of Westmoreland County.

• The Burning Bed, Sept. 12 — An abused wife (Farrah Fawcett) is acquitted at trial after lighting her drunken, passed-out husband (Paul Le Mat) on fire, killing him and burning the house down. Made for television, 1984.

Presented in partnership with the Blackburn Center.

Admission is $2 for each movie; refreshments will be provided.

The nonprofit Westmoreland Diversity Coalition works to to bring people together “to promote diversity from all walks of life, generate greater understanding and acceptance, and to help create through advocacy and education an atmosphere in Westmoreland County where all people feel welcome,” according to its website.

Details: wdcoalition.org

Shirley McMarlin is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Shirley at 724-836-5750, [email protected] or via Twitter .

Categories: AandE | Movies TV
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