ShareThis Page
Movies/TV

1947 best-picture Oscar sells for nearly $500,000 at auction

| Saturday, Dec. 15, 2018, 3:42 p.m.
FILE - This undated file image provided by Profiles in History shows Irving Thalberg's Academy Award for best picture for 'Mutiny on the Bounty.' The best picture statuette for 1935's 'Mutiny on the Bounty' fetched $240,000., in a rare auction of Oscars that ended Friday, Dec. 14, 2018, in Los Angeles. (Lou Bustamante/Profiles in History via AP, File)
FILE - This undated file image provided by Profiles in History shows Irving Thalberg's Academy Award for best picture for 'Mutiny on the Bounty.' The best picture statuette for 1935's 'Mutiny on the Bounty' fetched $240,000., in a rare auction of Oscars that ended Friday, Dec. 14, 2018, in Los Angeles. (Lou Bustamante/Profiles in History via AP, File)
FILE - This undated file image provided by Profiles in History shows the best picture Academy Award for 'Gentleman's Agreement.' The best-picture Oscar for 'Gentleman's Agreement,' the 1947 film starring Gregory Peck that took on anti-Semitism, sold for $492,000, in a rare auction of Oscars that ended Friday, Dec. 14, 2018, in Los Angeles. (Lou Bustamante/Profiles in History via AP, File)
FILE - This undated file image provided by Profiles in History shows the best picture Academy Award for 'Gentleman's Agreement.' The best-picture Oscar for 'Gentleman's Agreement,' the 1947 film starring Gregory Peck that took on anti-Semitism, sold for $492,000, in a rare auction of Oscars that ended Friday, Dec. 14, 2018, in Los Angeles. (Lou Bustamante/Profiles in History via AP, File)

LOS ANGELES — One Academy Award trophy sold for nearly $500,000 and the second for well over $200,000 in a rare auction of Oscars that ended Friday in Los Angeles.

A best-picture Oscar for “Gentleman’s Agreement,” the 1947 film starring Gregory Peck that took on anti-Semitism, sold for $492,000. A best picture statuette for 1935’s “Mutiny on the Bounty” fetched $240,000.

Both were outpaced by an archive of papers on the origin and development of “The Wizard of Oz” that brought in $1.2 million.

Auction house Profiles in History announced the results after four days of bidding on Hollywood memorabilia that brought in more than $8 million in total.

Other items sold include a TIE fighter helmet from the original “Star Wars” that went for $240,000, a Phaser pistol from the original “Star Trek” TV series that fetched $192,000, a hover board Marty McFly rode in “Back to the Future II” that sold for $102,000, and a golden ticket from “Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory” that brought in $48,000.

The “Mutiny on the Bounty” Oscar price came close to auction-house projections, but the “Gentleman’s Agreement” statuette brought in more than twice what was expected, for reasons that are not clear. The buyers of both Oscars and “The Wizard of Oz” document chose to remain anonymous.

Auctions of Oscar statuettes are very uncommon because winners from 1951 onward have had to agree that they or their heirs must offer it back to the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for $1 before selling it elsewhere. The academy has said it firmly believes Oscars should be won, not bought.

Neither of the Oscars sold this week approached the record of $1.5 million paid by Michael Jackson to acquire David O. Selznick’s “Gone With the Wind” Oscar in 1999.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me