ShareThis Page
Art & Museums

Trio of authors to address Norvelt's history at West Overton parlor talk

Mary Pickels
| Tuesday, March 6, 2018, 5:09 p.m.
Margaret Power, one of a trio of authors of 'Hope in Hard Times: Norvelt and the Struggle for Community During the Great Depression.' Power will be part of a presentation and question and answer session on March 24 at West Overton Village.
Submitted
Margaret Power, one of a trio of authors of 'Hope in Hard Times: Norvelt and the Struggle for Community During the Great Depression.' Power will be part of a presentation and question and answer session on March 24 at West Overton Village.
Seton Hill University professor Michael Cary is among three authors contributing to 'Hope in Hard Times: Norvelt and the Struggle for Community During the Great Depression.'
Submitted
Seton Hill University professor Michael Cary is among three authors contributing to 'Hope in Hard Times: Norvelt and the Struggle for Community During the Great Depression.'
The tale of Mt. Pleasant Township's Norvelt, a New Deal Homestead community, is told by three authors, including Timothy Kelly, Saint Vincent College professor of history.
Submitted
The tale of Mt. Pleasant Township's Norvelt, a New Deal Homestead community, is told by three authors, including Timothy Kelly, Saint Vincent College professor of history.
This marker notes Norvelt's establishment in 1934 as part of a New Deal Homestead project.
Submitted
This marker notes Norvelt's establishment in 1934 as part of a New Deal Homestead project.

Three college professors share author credit on the book, “Hope in Hard Times: Norvelt and the Struggle for Community During the Great Depression.”

Timothy Kelly, Margaret Power and Michael Cary all will attend a presentation and question and answer session from 2 to 5 p.m. March 24 at the West Overton Village .

The book was published by Penn State University Press in 2016.

Kelly, a Saint Vincent College history professor, has most recently published “The Transformation of American Catholicism.”

Power, a history professor at Illinois Institute of Technology, is co-editor of “New Perspectives on the Transnational Right” and author of “Right-Wing Women in Chile,” the latter also published by Penn State University Press.

Seton Hill University history and political science professor Michael Cary is author of “This American Courthouse.”

Among the many recipients of federal support during the Great Depression, Norvelt's citizens stand out as model reminders of the importance of New Deal programs. The 250 families worked with the federal government toward a new type community, raising standards of living through a cooperative lifestyle and enhanced civic engagement.

The book explores the residents' transitions as they create a middle-class community, as well as many of Norvelt's current inhabitants — many descendants of the originals — who state opposition to government intervention and public programs, according to a news release.

Books will be sold at the event. Admission is $5.

Details: 724-887-7910 or westovertonvillage.org/events

Mary Pickels is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach her at 724-836-5401 or mpickels@tribweb.com or via Twitter @MaryPickels.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me