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Art & Museums

Get the inside scoop on modern Catholic art

Mary Pickels
| Monday, Oct. 8, 2018, 10:03 a.m.
Vatican guide Elizabeth Lev will present ‘Catholic Art of the Modern Age: New Images for an Ancient Story’ in an Oct. 28 lecture at Saint Vincent College’s Fred M. Rogers Center.
Vatican guide Elizabeth Lev will present ‘Catholic Art of the Modern Age: New Images for an Ancient Story’ in an Oct. 28 lecture at Saint Vincent College’s Fred M. Rogers Center.
Art historian Elizabeth Lev, author of ‘How Catholic Art Saved the Faith,’ will speak Oct. 28 during a lecture in the Fred M. Rogers Center at Saint Vincent College.
Art historian Elizabeth Lev, author of ‘How Catholic Art Saved the Faith,’ will speak Oct. 28 during a lecture in the Fred M. Rogers Center at Saint Vincent College.

Vatican guide and art historian Elizabeth Lev will present the lecture “Catholic Art of the Modern Age: New Images for an Ancient Story,” at 2 p.m. Oct. 28 in the Fred M. Rogers Center at Saint Vincent College.

Presented in conjunction with the Seventh Juried Catholic Arts Exhibition , the lecture will examine the themes of Catholic art, according to a news release.

“The works of the Catholic Arts Exhibition demonstrate that art can still persuasively communicate ancient truths to the modern Church through the exploration of critical contemporary themes such as fatherhood, universality and religious persecution,” Lev says in the release.

Opening reception and award ceremony follows the lecture from 3:30-6 p.m. in the Saint Vincent Gallery, where the exhibition will continue through Dec. 2.

Lev, this year’s juror, is an American-born art historian specializing in Christian art and architecture, Baroque painting and sculpture and High Renaissance art. She is a professor of art and architecture for the Italian campuses of Christendom College and Duquesne University, and a licensed guide for the city of Rome and the Vatican Museums.

She has served as a Vatican analyst for NBC and has taught and lectured in numerous international venues including an address at the United Nations in New York entitled, “An Evening with Raphael: Raphael’s Art and Human Dignity,” and a TED talk representing the Vatican Museums entitled, “The Unheard Story of the Sistine Chapel.”

Lev serves as a consultant on art and faith for the Vatican Museums and has authored the documentary “Vatican Treasures: Art and Faith,” along with an accompanying course on the history of the museums for Vatican guides. She has served as a keynote speaker for Notre Dame University’s Center for Ethics where she is a permanent research fellow.

Both events are free and open to the public. Reservations required for Lev’s lecture.

Details: 724-805-2177 or gallery.stvincent.edu

Mary Pickels is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Mary at 724-836-5401, mpickels@tribweb.com or via Twitter @MaryPickels.

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