ShareThis Page
Art & Museums

Colorful, historical mural greets Mt. Pleasant, trail visitors

Mary Pickels
| Monday, Oct. 8, 2018, 2:48 p.m.

The result of four community “paint days” in Mt. Pleasant, a new mural titled “History Leaves an Impression” is now complete and on view on a wall of the American Architectural Salvage building facing the Coal & Coke Trail.

The mural , 15 feet high and 40 feet deep, was dedicated Oct. 6 at the 23 W. Main St. building.

It’s part of the Community Arts Reintegration Project for Westmoreland County.

Community members and seven area youths completing community service hours worked alongside mural artist/designer Bernie Wilke and reintegration project director Tim Holler in the giant paint-by-number effort.

Holler, assistant professor of criminal justice at the University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg, says the mural gives those reintegrating into the community a stake in a project and a connection with area residents.

“Coretta Scott King said, ‘The greatness of a community is most accurately measured by the compassionate actions of its members,’” Holler said during the dedication, attended by several dozen people.

“We dedicate this mural to the people of Mt. Pleasant and the Mt. Pleasant community,” Holler added.

Happy with its completion

Also contributing to the mural’s successful completion was Michael Diehl of Greensburg, who worked on the mural’s installation as his Eagle Scout project, along with members of Boy Scout Troop 478.

“I think it looks great. I’m just glad it’s done and I was able to do something for the community. There was a lot of work behind it, not just from me but from my fellow Scouts and from the community as well. I’m very happy with the way it turned out,” he says.

Diehl earned his Eagle Scout award on Aug. 10, three days before he turned 16.

“It was a good birthday present,” he says.

‘Bringing joy’

Wilke, an art history professor at Westmoreland County Community College, developed the mural from ideas suggested at public meetings.

Numerous aspects of Mt. Pleasant and its history, from the Main Street doughboy to coal mining to the annual celebration of its glass industry, are depicted in the brightly colored mural.

“Think of all the things that bring you joy in your life,” Wilke says.

From balloons to sprinkles on doughnuts, he adds, those things often involve color.

Murals march on

Project coordinators anticipate more murals in the future, with the next one anticipated to take place in New Kensington, Holler says.

Tay Waltenbaugh, Westmoreland Community Action executive director, also spoke on Saturday.

American Architectural Salvage is the organization’s retail store.

“It really epitomizes the region, the area, the community, in so many ways. The color is fantastic,” Waltenbaugh says. “Hopefully the other murals down the road that we have planned will turn out just as well as this.”

Mary Pickels is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Mary at 724-836-5401, mpickels@tribweb.com or via Twitter @MaryPickels.

Mary Pickels/Tribune-ReviewTim Holler, director of the Community Arts Reintegration Project for Westmoreland County, speaks Oct. 6 during the dedication of the Mt. Pleasant mural ‘History Leaves an Impression.’
Mary Pickels/Tribune-ReviewTim Holler, director of the Community Arts Reintegration Project for Westmoreland County, speaks Oct. 6 during the dedication of the Mt. Pleasant mural ‘History Leaves an Impression.’
Mary Pickels/Tribune-ReviewBernie Wilke, artist/designer, speaks during the Oct. 6 dedication of the mural ‘History Leaves an Impression’ in Mt. Pleasant.
Mary Pickels/Tribune-ReviewBernie Wilke, artist/designer, speaks during the Oct. 6 dedication of the mural ‘History Leaves an Impression’ in Mt. Pleasant.
The well-known doughboy that stands guard in the center of Mt. Pleasant’s business district is included in ‘History Leaves an Impression,’ the recently dedicated mural celebrating the borough’s history and culture.
The well-known doughboy that stands guard in the center of Mt. Pleasant’s business district is included in ‘History Leaves an Impression,’ the recently dedicated mural celebrating the borough’s history and culture.
‘We Are Free Because They Served’ reads this section of the new mural dedicated in Mt. Pleasant by the Community Arts Reintegration Project for Westmoreland County. The mural is on the American Architectural Salvage building wall facing the Coal & Coke Trail.
‘We Are Free Because They Served’ reads this section of the new mural dedicated in Mt. Pleasant by the Community Arts Reintegration Project for Westmoreland County. The mural is on the American Architectural Salvage building wall facing the Coal & Coke Trail.
Mt. Pleasant’s coal mining history is reflected in the bee hive coke ovens and miners in this new mural, the result of several community ‘paint days.’
Mt. Pleasant’s coal mining history is reflected in the bee hive coke ovens and miners in this new mural, the result of several community ‘paint days.’
‘History Leaves an Impression,’ the new mural painted by community residents, students, and other volunteers as part of  the Community Arts Reintegration Project for Westmoreland County, is shown prior to its recent dedication.
‘History Leaves an Impression,’ the new mural painted by community residents, students, and other volunteers as part of the Community Arts Reintegration Project for Westmoreland County, is shown prior to its recent dedication.
A section of the mural ‘History Leaves an Impression’ shows the Mt. Pleasant Glass & Ethnic Festival celebration.
A section of the mural ‘History Leaves an Impression’ shows the Mt. Pleasant Glass & Ethnic Festival celebration.
A close-up of the new mural at American Architectural Salavage in Mt. Pleasant, showing a portion of the borough’s history.
A close-up of the new mural at American Architectural Salavage in Mt. Pleasant, showing a portion of the borough’s history.
TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me