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Art & Museums

International Catholic arts competition includes winners from western, central Pennsylvania

Stephen Huba
| Monday, Nov. 5, 2018, 12:36 p.m.
'Ecce Homo' by William Ferry
Submitted
'Ecce Homo' by William Ferry
'The Coptic Martyrs of Libya' by Jordan Hainsey
Submitted
'The Coptic Martyrs of Libya' by Jordan Hainsey
'Fiat Mihi Secundum Verbum Tuum' by Manuel Farrugia
Submitted
'Fiat Mihi Secundum Verbum Tuum' by Manuel Farrugia
'Regina Caeli Laetare' by Margaret Farr
Submitted
'Regina Caeli Laetare' by Margaret Farr
'Saint Maximilian Kolbe' by Lisa Buggey
Submitted
'Saint Maximilian Kolbe' by Lisa Buggey
'Body and Blood of Christ' by Belita William
Submitted
'Body and Blood of Christ' by Belita William
'Adoration' by Daniel Bonnell
Submitted
'Adoration' by Daniel Bonnell

A woman from Greensburg was among the winners announced Friday in the seventh biennial Juried Catholic Arts Competition and Exhibition at Saint Vincent College.

Lisa Buggey won third prize for her acrylic painting “Saint Maximilian Kolbe.” She received a $500 cash prize.

Daniel Bonnell’s oil painting “Adoration” won first prize in the international competition, which is being exhibited in a multimedia show of religious-themed art at the Saint Vincent Gallery through Dec. 2.

With the first-place finish, Bonnell, a native of Savannah, Ga., won the Brother Nathan Cochran Award in Sacred Arts and a cash prize of $1,000.

Second prize of $750 was awarded to Belita William, for her oil-on-panel painting “Body and Blood of Christ.”

Four honorable mention prizes of $250 each were awarded to:

  • Margaret Farr, of Manassas, Va., for her mixed media, “Regina Caeli Laetare”
  • Manuel Farrugia, of Victoria, Malta, for his oil on canvas, “Fiat Mihi Secundum Verbum Tuum”
  • William Ferry of Oak Harbor, Wash., for his digital photograph, “Ecce Homo”
  • Jordan Hainsey, of Hollidaysburg, for his digital photograph, “The Coptic Martyrs of Libya”

A total of 44 works by artists from 17 states and three countries are included in the show, in which artists worked in mixed media, stainless steel, oil, acrylic, photography, watercolor, cast stone, plaster, fabric and other media.

Juror for the exhibition was Dr. Elizabeth Lev, an art historian who specializes in Christian art and architecture, Baroque painting and sculpture, and High Renaissance art. She is professor of art and architecture for the Italian campuses of Christendom College and Duquesne University.

The exhibition can be viewed in the Saint Vincent Gallery, located on the third floor of the Robert S. Carey Student Center, through Dec. 2. Gallery hours are 1-4 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday, and Thursday until 7 p.m. The gallery is closed on Monday, as well as Nov. 21-26 for Thanksgiving break. Admission is free and open to the public.

The exhibit is held every other year and attracts entries from all over the world. It was established in 2001 by Benedictine Brother Nathan Cochran, former curator and director of the gallery, as a way to foster the arts of the Western Christian tradition.

A people’s choice prize of $250, based on voting by visitors, will be awarded at the completion of the exhibition.

Stephen Huba is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Stephen at 724-850-1280, shuba@tribweb.com or via Twitter @shuba_trib.

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