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Art & Museums

Fort Ligonier’s ‘Hamilton’ connection, lecture plans

Mary Pickels
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Fort Ligonier draws "Hamilton" connections.

Although Alexander Hamilton never made it to western Pennsylvania in his lifetime, there are several connections to the “10-dollar Founding Father” in the Fort Ligonier museum today.

According to a news release, the smash Broadway musical’s song “History Has Its Eyes on You” references George Washington’s experiences in the French and Indian War that Washington recorded in his “Remarks,” on display in the fort’s Washington Gallery.

In another song, the line “America’s favorite fighting Frenchman” celebrates the Marquis de Lafayette, who gave his favorite general the saddle pistols also displayed in the Washington Gallery.

A portrait of King George III, who makes several memorable appearances in “Hamilton,” hangs in the fort’s art gallery.

“With the popularity of the blockbuster musical and a visit to Fort Ligonier’s museum to experience the ‘Hamilton’ connection, it’s a great way to see how the French and Indian War led to the American Revolution and the creation of a new nation,” Erica Nuckles, the museum’s director of history and collections, says in the release.

Fort cannon traveling to Philadelphia exhibit

In the spirit of all things “Hamilton,” Fort Ligonier is loaning one of its brass six-pounder cannons to Philadelphia’s Museum of the American Revolution for its exhibit, “Hamilton was Here: Rising Up in Revolutionary Philadelphia,” running through March 17.

The cannon helps to illustrate Hamilton’s service as an artillery officer during the American Revolution, the release adds.

Fort Ligonier is planning an overnight motorcoach trip to Philadelphia March 2-3 to see the fort’s cannon on display, visit the museum and participate in a special Hamilton lecture.

Details: Candace Gross at 724-238-9701 or fortligonier.org


Mary Pickels is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Mary at 724-836-5401, mpickels@tribweb.com or via Twitter @MaryPickels.


Mary Pickels is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Mary at 724-836-5401, mpickels@tribweb.com or via Twitter .

Categories: AandE | Museums
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