Fall Arts: Katharine Hepburn costumes highlight Frick Art Museum display | TribLIVE.com
Art & Museums

Fall Arts: Katharine Hepburn costumes highlight Frick Art Museum display

Candy Williams
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AP Photo/File
Screen actress Katharine Hepburn is shown in this 1940 file photo. “Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage and Screen” will be shown at the Frick Art Museum.

Fall brings exciting new exhibitions showcasing a wide range of artistic periods, styles and collections at area art museums. Highlights range from a study of collective memory and the synchronicity of time through the stories of women of color, at Westmore­land Museum of American Art, to a fun look at the glitzy and glamorous costumes and fashions worn by actress Katharine Hepburn, at the Frick Art Museum.

Westmoreland Museum of American Art

• “Era of Cool: The Art of John Van Hamersveld,” through Oct. 20. The artist is most known for his iconic poster “Endless Summer” that promoted the 1966 film of the same name. The exhibit will include a selection of Van Hamersveld’s album covers, poster designs, drawings, mural designs, photography and paintings. Events include a talk with the artist by museum chief curator Barbara Jones at 7 p.m. Oct. 2 at the museum, and a “Big Art Party, Peace. Love. Art” from 7:30-11 p.m. Oct. 5. Details are at www.thewestmoreland.org

• “POP/OP on Paper,” through Oct. 31 in the Carol R. Brown Gallery. Bright, intensely colored serigraphs from the museum’s permanent collection challenge the eyes and mind through optical illusions of color, shape and composition.

• “A Musical Number,” through Sept. 29 in the Robert­shaw Gallery. The exhibition comprises selections from the permanent collection by artists who depict music or sound themes in their work.

• “Alisha Wormsley: The space I am in: Oracles,” Oct. 4-Dec. 8. Work about collective memory and the synchronicity of time, through the stories of women of color. Opening reception Oct. 11.

• Associated Artists of Pittsburgh 107th Annual Exhibition, Nov. 2-Jan. 26.

Details: 724-837-1500 or thewestmoreland.org

Carnegie Museum of Art

• “An Art of Changes: Jasper Johns Prints, 1960-2018,” Oct. 12-Jan. 20. When Jasper Johns’ paintings of flags and targets debuted in 1958, they brought him instant acclaim and established him as a critical link between abstract expressionism and pop art. This exhibition includes some 90 of his works in intaglio, lithography, woodcut, linoleum cut, screen-printing and lead relief.

• “A Delight for the Senses: The Still Life,” Nov. 2-­ March 15. This exhibition explores nearly 250 years of the still life tradition from the Dutch Golden Age to America’s Gilded Age, featuring recent bequests from the late Drue Heinz, including the only Dutch Golden Age still life in the museum’s collection on view for the first time.

Details: cmoa.org

The Frick Art Museum

• “The Hunt for a Seat: Sporting Carriages in the Early 20th Century,” through Nov. 3. Exhibition explores the unique characteristics, design and history of sporting-class vehicles.

• “Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage and Screen,” Oct. 19-Jan. 12. Exhibition from the collection at the Kent State University Museum features a range of costumes and fashions instrumental in shaping some of the most memorable characters portrayed on stage or screen by the acclaimed actress (1907-2003).

Details: thefrickpittsburgh.org

Mattress Factory

• “Factory Installed 2019,” consisting of eight solo exhibitions by artists from around the world, including Jon Rubin and Sohrab Kashani, Tra Bouscaren, Naomi Draper, Nathan Hall, Patte Loper, Pepe Mar, Adam Milner and Patrick Robideau. Opens Sept. 27 through 2020. Each of the eight artists will create new, site-specific installations conceived for and executed in the space in which the public views them.

Details: mattress.org

The Warhol

• “Andy Warhol: Revelation” is the first exhibition to comprehensively examine the pop artist’s complex Catholic faith in relation to his artistic production, featuring more than 100 objects from the museum’s permanent collection including archival materials, drawings, paintings, prints and film. Oct. 20-Feb. 16.

Details: warhol.org

Candy Williams is a Tribune-Review contributing writer.

Categories: AandE | Museums
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