University of Pittsburgh dedicates Philippine Nationality Room | TribLIVE.com
Art & Museums

University of Pittsburgh dedicates Philippine Nationality Room

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop
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Aimee Obidzinski/University of Pittsburgh
Dedication ceremony for the Philippine Nationality Room held at Heinz Chapel and processing to the celebration an the Cathedral of Learning, June 9, 2019. Members of a local Filipino dance troupe perform dinagyang , an energetic street dance, before an enthusias tic crowd in the Cathedral of Learning Commons Room. The afternoon of colorful music, dance and Filipino food was a celebration of Sunday’s dedication of Pitt’s new Philippine Nationality Room.
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Aimee Obidzinski/University of Pittsburgh
Dedication ceremony for the Philippine Nationality Room held at Heinz Chapel and processing to the celebration an the Cathedral of Learning, June 9, 2019. Alex Ravano, a member of the Pittsburgh Filipino community, represents the Queen of Peace as she and others process from Heinz Chapel to the Cathedral of Learning during Sunday’s dedication of Pitt’s new Philippine Nationality Room. The procession of queens is part of a popular Philippine tradition called Santa Cruzan. Aimee Obidzinski/University of Pitts burgh .
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Aimee Obidzinski/University of Pittsburgh
Dedication ceremony for the Philippine Nationality Room held at Heinz Chapel and processing to the celebration an the Cathedral of Learning, June 9, 2019. Pitt Chancellor Patrick Gallagher (left) accepts the key to Pitt’s new Philippine Nationality Room from Father Manny Gelido, chair of the Philippine Nationality Room Task Force, during Sunday’s dedication of the new room which took place at Heinz Chapel.
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Aimee Obidzinski/University of Pittsburgh
Dedication ceremony for the Philippine Nationality Room held at Heinz Chapel and processing to the celebration an the Cathedral of Learning, June 9, 2019. Cerina Wichryk, a member of Oakdale’s Filipino community, leads a procession of young Filipino women called queens, each walk ing under an arch of flowers and each representing a title of the Blessed Mother. It was part of Sunday’s dedication of Pitt’s new Philippine Nationality Room.
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Aimee Obidzinski/University of Pittsburgh
Dedication ceremony for the Philippine Nationality Room held at Heinz Chapel and processing to the celebration an the Cathedral of Learning, June 9, 2019. Cerina Wichryk, a member of Oakdale’ s Filipino community, wears a sash that says Reyna Fe, or Queen of Faith, as she walks under an archway of flowers with her unidentified escort. Each queen in the process ion represents a different title of the Blessed Mother. This tradition, called the Santa Cruzan, is celebrated throughout the Philippines. It was part of Sunday’s dedication of Pitt’s new Philippine Nationality Room.

The University of Pittsburgh dedicated its 31st Nationality Room on Sunday –the Philippine Room – inside the Cathedral of Learning.

The events included a procession from the Cathedral of Learning to nearby Heinz Chapel, where the dedication took place. Pitt Chancellor Patrick Gallagher was presented a room key.

Twenty years in the making, the room is the first to be dedicated since 2015. Pitt’s Nationality Rooms, established in 1926, pay tribute to various cultural groups that settled in Allegheny County. The classrooms are located on the first and third floors of the Cathedral of Learning and are used as functioning classrooms. They are maintained and supported through a partnership between the local populations of these cultural groups and the University of Pittsburgh.

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact JoAnne at 412-320-7889, [email protected] or via Twitter .

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