West Overton annual Whiskey Smash salutes its history | TribLIVE.com
Art & Museums

West Overton annual Whiskey Smash salutes its history

Mary Pickels
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Kim Stepinsky | Tribune-Review
Jamie Owens (from left) and John Leese, both of Irwin, sample whiskey from Herman C. Mihalich, founder and distiller of Dad’s Hat Whiskey, located in Bucks County, during a past Whiskey Smash, held at the West Overton Village and Museums. This year’s event is Nov. 16.

West Overton Village and Museums is planning its fifth annual Whiskey Smash, celebrating local distilleries and the popularity of craft whiskey and distilled products.

The historical site in East Huntingdon holds the popular fundraiser to help ensure ongoing preservation and interpretation efforts.

The fun begins at 6 p.m. Nov. 16 and includes light fare, desserts, cocktails and live music.

Distillers and representatives from Dad’s Hat Rye, Liberty Pole Spirits, Red Pump Spirits, Stoll & Wolfe Distillery, Crooked Creek Distillery and Tall Pines Distillery will be stationed throughout the museum sharing and discussing their products with attendees, according to a release.

“Crooked Creek Distillery is new this year. We also are going to have Greenhouse Winery this year. In the past, we have gotten some feedback from guests that one spouse was really into whiskey and the other spouse came to humor them,” says Aleasha Monroe, West Overton’s chief of staff. Wine will offer imbibers an additional choice, she says.

Returning to the place from whence it began, Old Overholt will be among the featured products.

“We will have a welcome cocktail by Old Overholt, with a representative from the brand here,” Monroe says. The Whiskey Smash features simple syrup and mint leaves.

Now produced in Clermont, Ky., by a subsidiary of Beam Suntory, Old Overholt was founded at West Overton in 1810 and is said to be the oldest continually maintained brand of whiskey in the United States.

Yuengling and Helltown Brewing’s Cream Ale also are donating to this year’s event, Monroe adds.

Janie Poole, local tribute vocalist, will entertain with standards ranging from Patsy Cline to Motown. “She seems like a good fit for the ‘Smash,’ ” Monroe says.

Guests must be 21 and up. All tickets are sold in advance.

VIP tickets are $75 and include early entry at 5 p.m. and a limited edition tasting glass sponsored by the Pennsylvania Distiller’s Guild. General admission tickets are $50, with doors opening at 6 p.m.

Details: 724-887-7910 or westoverton village.org

Mary Pickels is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Mary at 724-836-5401, [email protected] or via Twitter .

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