ShareThis Page
Business Briefs

Roundup: Insurer Anthem offers layers of identity theft protection; US allows imports of privately produced products from Cub...

| Saturday, Feb. 14, 2015, 12:01 a.m.
This undated photo provided by Mattel shows an updated View-Master.  Mattel and Google are trying to bring the 75-year-old View-Master into the 21st century, updating the iconic stereoscopic photo viewer with smartphone compatibility and virtual reality technology. Mattel Inc. and Google Inc. unveiled the virtual reality viewer Friday, Feb. 13, 2015 at Mattel’s New York City office. The device launches in the fall, so the companies had no finished product to show off.  (AP Photo/Mattel) NO SALES
This undated photo provided by Mattel shows an updated View-Master. Mattel and Google are trying to bring the 75-year-old View-Master into the 21st century, updating the iconic stereoscopic photo viewer with smartphone compatibility and virtual reality technology. Mattel Inc. and Google Inc. unveiled the virtual reality viewer Friday, Feb. 13, 2015 at Mattel’s New York City office. The device launches in the fall, so the companies had no finished product to show off. (AP Photo/Mattel) NO SALES

Insurer Anthem offers free ID theft protection

Anthem Inc. is offering several levels of free identity theft protection to current and former customers dating back more than a decade as it continues to investigate how hackers broke into a database storing information for about 80 million people. The Indianapolis company said Friday that for two years it will provide credit monitoring, identity theft repair assistance if someone experiences fraud, and identity protection designed specifically for children. The services are available to all current and former customers since 2004. The Blue Cross-Blue Shield insurer said last week that hackers evaded several security layers to reach its database sometime after Dec. 10 and before Jan. 27, when a computer system administrator discovered outsiders were using his credentials to log into the system.

U.S. to allow some privately produced imports from Cuba

The Obama administration is announcing that it will allow Cuba's small private business sector to sell goods to the United States in a potentially important loosening of the half-century trade embargo on the communist island. A list published Friday by the State Department said Americans will be allowed to import anything produced by Cuban entrepreneurs with the exception of food and agricultural products, alcohol, minerals, chemicals, textiles, machinery, vehicles, arms and ammunition. The imports would have to be produced by a Cuban operating in one of the dozens of categories of private business allowed by the Cuban government. Most of the categories are for services such as car maintenance or watch repair, not potentially exportable goods. In short, no one should expect Cuban goods to start flowing to America in large quantities anytime soon, said Pedro Freyre, head of international practice at Florida-based law firm Akerman LLP.

Apple hiring auto experts for secret research project

Apple Inc. is hiring automotive technology and design experts to staff up a top-secret research lab, with the possible intention of building a car, the Financial Times reported on Friday, citing several people familiar with the iPhone maker. It's unclear whether the world's largest smartphone maker is simply looking for talent to shore up CarPlay, the in-car entertainment and software service that CEO Tim Cook has identified as pivotal to the company's longer-term future. The background and seniority of the executives it is recruiting suggest that Apple may be trying to build a car, the newspaper said, citing sources. Apple recently hired the head of Mercedes-Benz's Silicon Valley research and development unit, Johann Jungwirth, according to a LinkedIn profile.

Google, Mattel aim to bring View-Master into 21st century

Mattel and Google are trying to bring the 75-year-old View-Master into the 21st century — with some help from smartphones and virtual reality technology. The original View-Masters gave people a chance to click through colorful photos by inserting reels into the viewing devices. Targeted at families, the updated View-Master has users insert a smartphone into a headset. A smartphone app will enable the gadget to immerse children in a slew of virtual worlds, from far-off cities to outer space. The View-Masters will be priced about $30. Mattel and Google revealed the virtual reality viewer Friday at Mattel's New York City office.

— Staff and wire reports

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me