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Move over UPS truck: Amazon delivery vans to hit the street

| Thursday, June 28, 2018, 7:21 a.m.
Dave Clark, senior vice president of worldwide operations for Amazon.com, talks to reporters, Wednesday, June 27, 2018, in Seattle, at a media event to announce a new program that lets entrepreneurs around the country launch businesses that deliver Amazon packages. It's another way for Amazon to gain greater control over how its packages are delivered. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Dave Clark, senior vice president of worldwide operations for Amazon.com, talks to reporters, Wednesday, June 27, 2018, in Seattle, at a media event to announce a new program that lets entrepreneurs around the country launch businesses that deliver Amazon packages. It's another way for Amazon to gain greater control over how its packages are delivered. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Dave Clark, senior vice president of worldwide operations for Amazon.com, talks to reporters, Wednesday, June 27, 2018, in Seattle, at a media event to announce a new program for entrepreneurs to sign on to use Amazon Prime-branded vans and get support from the company as they form businesses to deliver Amazon packages. The move comes as Amazon is trying to take more control over its delivery operations and to build up its own shipping and logistics, which are currently handled by UPS, the U.S. Postal Service and other delivery services. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Dave Clark, senior vice president of worldwide operations for Amazon.com, talks to reporters, Wednesday, June 27, 2018, in Seattle, at a media event to announce a new program for entrepreneurs to sign on to use Amazon Prime-branded vans and get support from the company as they form businesses to deliver Amazon packages. The move comes as Amazon is trying to take more control over its delivery operations and to build up its own shipping and logistics, which are currently handled by UPS, the U.S. Postal Service and other delivery services. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Parisa Sadrzadeh, left, a senior manager of logistics for Amazon.com, demonstrates a package delivery for journalists, Wednesday, June 27, 2018, at a media event in Seattle to announce a new program for entrepreneurs to sign on to use Amazon Prime-branded vans and get support from the company as they form businesses to deliver Amazon packages. The move comes as Amazon is trying to take more control over its delivery operations and to build up its own shipping and logistics, which are currently handled by UPS, the U.S. Postal Service and other delivery services. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Parisa Sadrzadeh, left, a senior manager of logistics for Amazon.com, demonstrates a package delivery for journalists, Wednesday, June 27, 2018, at a media event in Seattle to announce a new program for entrepreneurs to sign on to use Amazon Prime-branded vans and get support from the company as they form businesses to deliver Amazon packages. The move comes as Amazon is trying to take more control over its delivery operations and to build up its own shipping and logistics, which are currently handled by UPS, the U.S. Postal Service and other delivery services. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Parisa Sadrzadeh, center, a senior manager of logistics for Amazon.com, demonstrates a package delivery for journalists, Wednesday, June 27, 2018, at a media event in Seattle to announce a new program for entrepreneurs to sign on to use Amazon Prime-branded vans and get support from the company as they form businesses to deliver Amazon packages. The move comes as Amazon is trying to take more control over its delivery operations and to build up its own shipping and logistics, which are currently handled by UPS, the U.S. Postal Service and other delivery services. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Parisa Sadrzadeh, center, a senior manager of logistics for Amazon.com, demonstrates a package delivery for journalists, Wednesday, June 27, 2018, at a media event in Seattle to announce a new program for entrepreneurs to sign on to use Amazon Prime-branded vans and get support from the company as they form businesses to deliver Amazon packages. The move comes as Amazon is trying to take more control over its delivery operations and to build up its own shipping and logistics, which are currently handled by UPS, the U.S. Postal Service and other delivery services. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Parisa Sadrzadeh, center, a senior manager of logistics for Amazon.com, demonstrates a package delivery for journalists, Wednesday, June 27, 2018, at a media event in Seattle to announce a new program for entrepreneurs to sign on to use Amazon Prime-branded vans and get support from the company as they form businesses to deliver Amazon packages. The move comes as Amazon is trying to take more control over its delivery operations and to build up its own shipping and logistics, which are currently handled by UPS, the U.S. Postal Service and other delivery services. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Parisa Sadrzadeh, center, a senior manager of logistics for Amazon.com, demonstrates a package delivery for journalists, Wednesday, June 27, 2018, at a media event in Seattle to announce a new program for entrepreneurs to sign on to use Amazon Prime-branded vans and get support from the company as they form businesses to deliver Amazon packages. The move comes as Amazon is trying to take more control over its delivery operations and to build up its own shipping and logistics, which are currently handled by UPS, the U.S. Postal Service and other delivery services. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Parisa Sadrzadeh, a senior manager of logistics for Amazon.com, opens the door of an Amazon-branded delivery van at the request of a photographer, Wednesday, June 27, 2018, following a media event in Seattle to announce a new program for entrepreneurs to sign on to use Amazon Prime-branded vans and get support from the company as they form businesses to deliver Amazon packages. The move comes as Amazon is trying to take more control over its delivery operations and to build up its own shipping and logistics, which are currently handled by UPS, the U.S. Postal Service and other delivery services. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Parisa Sadrzadeh, a senior manager of logistics for Amazon.com, opens the door of an Amazon-branded delivery van at the request of a photographer, Wednesday, June 27, 2018, following a media event in Seattle to announce a new program for entrepreneurs to sign on to use Amazon Prime-branded vans and get support from the company as they form businesses to deliver Amazon packages. The move comes as Amazon is trying to take more control over its delivery operations and to build up its own shipping and logistics, which are currently handled by UPS, the U.S. Postal Service and other delivery services. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Dave Clark, back center right, senior vice president of worldwide operations for Amazon.com, and Olaoluwa Abimbola, back center left, one of Amazon's beta participants in a new delivery business offering, talk to reporters, Wednesday, June 27, 2018, in Seattle, at a media event to announce a new program for entrepreneurs to sign on to use Amazon Prime-branded vans and get support from the company as they form businesses to deliver Amazon packages. The move comes as Amazon is trying to take more control over its delivery operations and to build up its own shipping and logistics, which are currently handled by UPS, the U.S. Postal Service and other delivery services. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Dave Clark, back center right, senior vice president of worldwide operations for Amazon.com, and Olaoluwa Abimbola, back center left, one of Amazon's beta participants in a new delivery business offering, talk to reporters, Wednesday, June 27, 2018, in Seattle, at a media event to announce a new program for entrepreneurs to sign on to use Amazon Prime-branded vans and get support from the company as they form businesses to deliver Amazon packages. The move comes as Amazon is trying to take more control over its delivery operations and to build up its own shipping and logistics, which are currently handled by UPS, the U.S. Postal Service and other delivery services. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Olaoluwa Abimbola, one of Amazon.com's beta participants in a new delivery business offering, talks to reporters, Wednesday, June 27, 2018, in Seattle, at a media event to announce a new program for entrepreneurs to sign on to get Amazon Prime-branded vans and support from the company as they form businesses to deliver Amazon packages. The move comes as Amazon is trying to take more control over its delivery operations and to build up its own shipping and logistics, which are currently handled by UPS, the U.S. Postal Service and other delivery services. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Olaoluwa Abimbola, one of Amazon.com's beta participants in a new delivery business offering, talks to reporters, Wednesday, June 27, 2018, in Seattle, at a media event to announce a new program for entrepreneurs to sign on to get Amazon Prime-branded vans and support from the company as they form businesses to deliver Amazon packages. The move comes as Amazon is trying to take more control over its delivery operations and to build up its own shipping and logistics, which are currently handled by UPS, the U.S. Postal Service and other delivery services. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Dave Clark, senior vice president of worldwide operations for Amazon.com, talks to reporters, Wednesday, June 27, 2018, in Seattle, at a media event to announce a new program for entrepreneurs to sign on to use Amazon Prime-branded vans and get support from the company as they form businesses to deliver Amazon packages. The move comes as Amazon is trying to take more control over its delivery operations and to build up its own shipping and logistics, which are currently handled by UPS, the U.S. Postal Service and other delivery services. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Dave Clark, senior vice president of worldwide operations for Amazon.com, talks to reporters, Wednesday, June 27, 2018, in Seattle, at a media event to announce a new program for entrepreneurs to sign on to use Amazon Prime-branded vans and get support from the company as they form businesses to deliver Amazon packages. The move comes as Amazon is trying to take more control over its delivery operations and to build up its own shipping and logistics, which are currently handled by UPS, the U.S. Postal Service and other delivery services. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

SEATTLE — Your Amazon packages, which usually show up in a UPS truck, an unmarked vehicle or in the hands of a mail carrier, may soon be delivered from an Amazon van.

The online retailer, wanting more control over how its packages are delivered, is rolling out a program Thursday that lets entrepreneurs around the country launch businesses that deliver Amazon packages. They'll be able to lease blue vans with the Amazon logo stamped on it, buy Amazon uniforms for drivers and get support from Amazon to grow their business. In return, Amazon gets more ways to ship its packages to shoppers without having to rely on UPS, FedEx and other package delivery services.

With these vans on the road, Amazon said more shoppers would be able to track their packages on a map, contact the driver or change where a package is left -- all of which it can't do if the package is in the back of UPS or FedEx truck.

Amazon has beefed up its delivery network in other ways: It has a fleet of cargo planes it calls “Prime Air” and announced last year that it was building an air cargo hub in Kentucky.

Recently, the company has come under fire from President Donald Trump who tweeted that Amazon should pay the U.S. Postal Service more for shipping its packages. Dave Clark, Amazon's senior vice president of worldwide operations, said the new program is not a response to the president, but a way to make sure the company can deliver its growing number of orders. “This is really about meeting growth for our future,” Clark said.

Through the program, Amazon said it can cost as little as $10,000 for someone to start the delivery business. They don't have to lease the Amazon blue vans, but if they do, those vehicles can only be used to deliver Amazon packages, the company said. The entrepreneur will be responsible for hiring delivery people, and Amazon would be the customer, paying the business to pick up packages from its 75 delivery centers around the country and delivering them to shopper's doorsteps. An Amazon representative declined to give details on how much it will pay for the deliveries.

Amazon set up a website, Logistics.Amazon.com , where entrepreneurs can apply for the program.

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