ShareThis Page
Technology

Voting opens Wednesday for extra $50,000 in Google's Impact Challenge

Aaron Aupperlee
| Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2018, 12:21 p.m.
Winners of the Google.org Impact Challenge Pittsburgh pose for a photo during an event honoring them Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2018 at Google's offices in Bakery Square. (Photo by Aaron Aupperlee)
Winners of the Google.org Impact Challenge Pittsburgh pose for a photo during an event honoring them Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2018 at Google's offices in Bakery Square. (Photo by Aaron Aupperlee)
Kamal Nigam, site lead for Google Pittsburgh, talks about the four winners of the Google.org Impact Challenge Pittsburgh on Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2018, at Google’s offices in Bakery Square.
Aaron Aupperlee
Kamal Nigam, site lead for Google Pittsburgh, talks about the four winners of the Google.org Impact Challenge Pittsburgh on Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2018, at Google’s offices in Bakery Square.
Google.org presented winners of its Impact Challenge Pittsburgh with glass cubes and $50,000. (Photo by Aaron Aupperlee)
Google.org presented winners of its Impact Challenge Pittsburgh with glass cubes and $50,000. (Photo by Aaron Aupperlee)

Voting began Wednesday in the next phase of the Google.org Impact Challenge Pittsburgh.

The nonprofit with the most votes will snag another $50,000 from Google.

Google last week awarded four Pittsburgh nonprofits $50,000 each in the first phase of the challenge. The public can now vote for which of those four should double their prize money.

The four finalists are:

• Idea Foundry, which wants to help establish 10 businesses led by immigrants or minorities.

• Pittsburgh Conservation Corps, which wants to put more than 150 people previously on public assistance to work performing nearly 110,000 hours of restoration work.

• Pittsburgh Community Kitchen, which wants to provide culinary training and employment to up to 100 people who are coming out of jail or prison or struggling with mental illness, addiction or homelessness.

• Prototype PGH, which wants to put 1,000 women through 100 workshops and equip them with skills and confidence to seek raises, get higher-paying jobs or switch to more fulfilling careers.

Erin Gatz and E.Louise Larson, founders and co-chief executive officers of Prototype, wrote in a letter to supporters Wednesday urging them to vote that the feminist makerspace would use the additional $50,000 to hire leadership staff, purchase an 80-watt laser cutter and add more tools to the workshop.

Ilyssa Manspeizer, executive director of Pittsburgh Conservation Corps, said doubling the money will double her program's impact.

Mike Matesic, president and CEO of Idea Foundry, said the extra $50,000 could go toward helping people involved in programs by the other three finalists. Matesic said that as people graduate from programs with Prototype, Pittsburgh Conservation Corps or Pittsburgh Community Kitchen, Idea Foundry could help them start or grow a business. Idea Foundry and Pittsburgh Conservation Corps have a meeting set in a few weeks to discussion collaborations.

“There are great synergies with the other winners, and we immediately saw the opportunities to provide follow-on support and funding,” Matesic said.

People can vote for the nonprofit they believe has the most promise here .

Voting will close March 14. The People's Choice winner will be announced the following day.

Aaron Aupperlee is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at aaupperlee@tribweb.com, 412-336-8448 or via Twitter @tinynotebook.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me