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Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey to speak in Pittsburgh

Aaron Aupperlee
| Monday, March 5, 2018, 2:33 p.m.
Twitter Inc. named interim CEO Jack Dorsey as its permanent chief executive on Monday, Oct. 5, 2015, and said he would remain at the helm of fast-growing mobile payments company Square.
REUTERS
Twitter Inc. named interim CEO Jack Dorsey as its permanent chief executive on Monday, Oct. 5, 2015, and said he would remain at the helm of fast-growing mobile payments company Square.
This file photograph taken on December 28, 2016, shows logos of US online news and social networking service Twitter in Vertou, western France.
Internet giants were expected to tell Congress this week that Russian-backed content aimed at manipulating US politics during last year's election was more extensive than first thought. Facebook, Google and Twitter were slated to share what they have learned so far from digging into possible connections between Russian entities and posts, ads, and even videos shared on YouTube.
AFP/Getty Images
This file photograph taken on December 28, 2016, shows logos of US online news and social networking service Twitter in Vertou, western France. Internet giants were expected to tell Congress this week that Russian-backed content aimed at manipulating US politics during last year's election was more extensive than first thought. Facebook, Google and Twitter were slated to share what they have learned so far from digging into possible connections between Russian entities and posts, ads, and even videos shared on YouTube.
Castleberry-Singleton
Submitted
Castleberry-Singleton

Twitter's CEO and the company's head of inclusion and diversity will speak in Pittsburgh later this month.

The Pittsburgh Technology Council is bringing Jack Dorsey and Candi Castleberry-Singleton, a former UPMC executive, to town to talk about Twitter, its influence and the company's efforts to promote diversity, inclusion and civil, public discussion.

Black Tech Nation and Vibrant Pittsburgh are working with the tech council on the event.

The discussion is on March 23 at the Omni William Penn Hotel and is open to Pittsburgh Technology Council members and people invited by Black Tech Nation and Vibrant Pittsburgh.

Nearly 100 members registered for the chat within the first hours of the tech council announcing it.

"Twitter is what's happening in the world and what people are talking about right now. Jack Dorsey, CEO of Twitter, will offer perspective on how Twitter informs and serves the public conversation, how users influence the platform, and how Twitter's commitment to 'Me. We. Us. The World. #GrowTogether' strategy will help create a more inclusive company and community on the platform," the tech council wrote on its website .

Dorsey, a co-founder of Twitter and CEO since 2015, recently tweeted a plea to make the social network a nicer place and accepted responsibility for the spread of misinformation and harassment, Bloomberg reported .

"We have witnessed abuse, harassment, troll armies, manipulation through bots and human-coordination, misinformation campaigns, and increasingly divisive echo chambers," Dorsey tweeted. "We aren't proud of how people have taken advantage of our service, or our inability to address it fast enough."

Castleberry-Singleton started at Twitter last year as the company's vice president of inclusion and diversity. UPMC hired Castleberry-Singleton in 2008 as its first chief inclusion and diversity officer. She ushered in the health system's Dignity and Respect campaign and left UPMC in 2015 to take the campaign to other corporations.

The discussion with Dorsey and Castleberry-Singleton is free to Pittsburgh Technology Council members. More information is available here .

Aaron Aupperlee is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at aaupperlee@tribweb.com, 412-336-8448 or via Twitter @tinynotebook.

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