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Could Apple build its next campus in Pennsylvania? Bloomberg thinks so

Aaron Aupperlee
| Friday, March 9, 2018, 11:39 a.m.
(L-R) The new iPhone 8, iPhone X and iPhone 8S are displayed during an Apple special event at the Steve Jobs Theatre on the Apple Park campus on September 12, 2017 in Cupertino, California. Apple held their first special event at the new Apple Park campus where they announced the new iPhone 8, iPhone X and the Apple Watch Series 3.  (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
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(L-R) The new iPhone 8, iPhone X and iPhone 8S are displayed during an Apple special event at the Steve Jobs Theatre on the Apple Park campus on September 12, 2017 in Cupertino, California. Apple held their first special event at the new Apple Park campus where they announced the new iPhone 8, iPhone X and the Apple Watch Series 3. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Stop me if you've heard this one before.

A major technology company is looking to expand, and Pennsylvania is on its radar.

Pennsylvania could be in the running for Apple's fourth campus, according to an analysis by Bloomberg .

The news outlet looked at where Apple already has offices, where it has a high density of part suppliers, and cities that offer good tax incentives and business environments, educated workforces and public transportation.

“When you consider all these factors, Apple seems likely to choose among northeastern states such as Pennsylvania, Massachusetts and upstate New York; North Carolina and Florida in the southeast; and Midwestern states like Illinois and Wisconsin,” the Bloomberg reporters concluded, adding that a campus in the Eastern Time Zone also gives Apple a jumpstart on the day.

Tim McNulty, a spokesman for Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto, said he was not aware of any communication between Apple and the city regarding a campus in Pittsburgh. Allegheny County and Allegheny Conference on Community Development declined to speak specifically about discussions that may or may not be talking place with Apple.

Apple operates a technology hub in Pittsburgh's Strip District. The company employs more than 350 people between its Pittsburgh office, retail stores and other locations, a company spokesman told the Tribune-Review in January. Across Pennsylvania, Apple employs about 1,300 people. Apple employs 84,000 people across the country.

Pittsburgh and Philadelphia were included in Bloomberg's analysis of cities with good public transportation and educated work forces. The cities were not included as ones offering good tax incentives or business environments.

Apple in January announced it will build a new campus somewhere in the United States . The new campus is part of plans to create more than 20,000 jobs and invest more than $30 billion in the United States over the next five years.

The location of the new campus will be revealed later this year. Apple will not launch an Amazon HQ2-style bidding process for the new campus.

Pittsburgh and Philadelphia are finalists for Amazon's second headquarters, which could bring 50,000 jobs and $5 billion in investment. Amazon has said it will announce the winning city later this year.

This isn't the first time Pennsylvania has been in the mix for a major technology development including Apple. In January 2017, Pennsylvania trade and economic development officials met with the chairman of Foxconn Technology Group, a Taiwanese technology device manufacturer famous for making Apple products, to discuss the company building in the state. Foxconn Chairman Terry Gou said he'd like to invest in Pennsylvania following that meeting.

The display manufacturing facility would cost more than $7 billion and might create 30,000 to 50,000 jobs, Gou said. But Pennsylvania did not land the Foxconn facility. The company will build in Wisconsin instead.

Foxconn in 2013 announced plans to build a $30 million plant in Harrisburg and invest $10 million in Carnegie Mellon University for research and development. The Harrisburg factory was not built and the status of the R7D funding to CMU is unknown.

Aaron Aupperlee is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at aaupperlee@tribweb.com or 412-336-8448.

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