Apple, Google continue inclusive push with new emojis | TribLIVE.com
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Apple, Google continue inclusive push with new emojis

Associated Press
1422381_web1_1422381-0357e3184cfc448a8361609df4c5a82f
Apple via AP
This image provided by Apple shows new emojis released by Apple. Both Apple and Google are rolling out dozens of new emojis that, as usual, included cute crittters, but also ones that expand the boundaries of inclusion.
1422381_web1_1422381-75accc1bb94745cba33dbc637ab74427
Apple via AP
This image provided by Apple shows new emojis released by Apple. Both Apple and Google are rolling out dozens of new emojis that, as usual, included cute crittters, but also ones that expand the boundaries of inclusion.
1422381_web1_1422381-baf66662183344f8a7b8a6271c85f9e9
Apple via AP
This image provided by Apple shows new emojis released by Apple. Both Apple and Google are rolling out dozens of new emojis that, as usual, included cute crittters, but also ones that expand the boundaries of inclusion.

Apple and Google are rolling out dozens of new emojis that of course include cute critters, but also expand the number of images of human diversity.

The announcement coincides with Wednesday’s World Emoji Day.

Apple Inc. is releasing new variants of its holding hands emoji that allow people to pick any combination of skin tone and gender, 75 possible combinations in all. There are also wheelchairs, prosthetic arms and legs, as well as a new guide dog and an ear with a hearing aid.

And then there’s the sloth, the flamingo, the skunk, the orangutan, as well as a new yawning emoji.

New emojis routinely pop up every year. Earlier this year the Unicode Consortium approved 71 new variations of emoji for couples of color.

Apple said its new emojis will be available in the fall with a free software update for the iPhone, iPad, Mac and Apple Watch.

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