Colorado OKs electric car requirement to fight air pollution | TribLIVE.com
Technology

Colorado OKs electric car requirement to fight air pollution

Associated Press
1552668_web1_1552668-7a021143f0854bbaa1b0537a40b5f802
ap
In this June 26, 2018. file photo, a Nissan Leaf charges at a recharge station while parked by the Denver City County Building in downtown Denver. The Colorado Air Quality Control Commission approved a new regulation on Friday, Aug. 16, 2019, requiring that at least 5% of the vehicles sold in the state by 2023 emit zero pollution. The rule approved Friday by the state Air Quality Control Commission applies to auto manufactures, not buyers. It’s intended to boost the number of electric vehicles in a state struggling to control air pollution in heavily populated areas.

DENVER — Colorado tightened its air quality regulations on Friday, requiring that at least 5% of the vehicles sold in the state by 2023 emit zero pollution.

The state Air Quality Control Commission, which passed the rule on an 8-1 vote, said the requirement applies to auto manufacturers, not buyers. It’s intended to boost the number of electric vehicles in a state struggling to control ozone pollution in its most heavily populated area.

The minimum rises to 6.23% in 2025.

Colorado is the 11th state to adopt zero-emission standards, according to Green Car Reports, which tracks developments in low-pollution vehicles.

Two auto industry groups, Global Automakers and the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers, applauded the rule. They said they had been working with Colorado officials on how to structure the requirement.

John Bozzella, president of Global Automakers, said Colorado had adopted an innovative policy by collaborating with manufacturers.

Environmental groups also welcomed the standards, but the Colorado Freedom to Drive Coalition called them costly and ineffective.

“We believe commissioners did a disservice to all Coloradans, but especially Coloradans of modest means,” coalition spokeswoman Sara Almerri said.

Regulators said the zero-emission standard is aimed at reducing ozone and greenhouse gases, which contribute to climate change.

Democratic Gov. Jared Polis directed the Air Quality Control Commission to set a zero-emissions standard shortly after he took office in January. In a statement Friday, he said the new rule was “only the beginning” of the state’s work to reduce air pollution.

Excessive ground-level ozone has plagued Colorado’s urban areas for years. Ozone is the main component of smog and can aggravate asthma and contribute to early deaths from respiratory disease. It’s created from pollution emitted by vehicles, the oil and gas industry and other sources.

Ozone alerts have frequently flashed on signs over Denver freeways this summer, asking drivers to reduce car trips.

Last week, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said Denver and the northern Colorado urban corridor failed to meet federal ozone standards and said the state must come up with a new plan to clean up the air.

The state is also rewriting air pollution rules for the oil and gas industry.

Categories: Business | Technology
TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.