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Out & About: Urban fantasy author visits Seton Hill writing group | TribLIVE.com
Out & About

Out & About: Urban fantasy author visits Seton Hill writing group

Shirley McMarlin
| Monday, January 14, 2019 1:30 a.m
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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
George Galuschak (left), of Lodi, N.J., joins Seton Hill University WPF faculty Scott A. Johnson of Austin, Texas, for a photo Tuesday during the talk and reception with author Kevin Hearne at the SHU Performing Arts Center in Greensburg.
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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
Janice and Matt Snyder of Monroeville have books signed by author Kevin Hearne during the talk and reception with Hearne held Tuesday at the SHU Performing Arts Center in Greensburg.
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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
Seton Hill University MFA students (from left) Victoria Scott of Howell, Mich., Marx Pyle of Evansville, Ind., and Jean Thomas of Lexington, Ky., pose for a photo while waiting to have their books signed by author Kevin Hearne during the talk and reception with Hearne held Tuesday at the SHU Performing Arts Center in Greensburg.
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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
Seton Hill University Popular Fiction program student Rasheedah Shahid-Tezak (left) of Minneapolis has a book signed by author Kevin Hearne during the talk and reception with Hearne held Tuesday at the SHU Performing Arts Center in Greensburg.
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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
Seton Hill University Popular Fiction program students (from left) Tamar Gould of Harbin, China, Katherine Dow of San Francisco, Calif., Sarah McElfresh of Silverton, Ore., and Lisa Sherman of Chicago gather for a photo Tuesday during the talk and reception with author Kevin Hearne at the SHU Performing Arts Center in Greensburg.
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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
Author Kevin Hearne of Arizona joins Seton Hill University Popular Fiction program director Nicole Peeler for a photo Teusday during a talk and reception with Hearne at the SHU Performing Arts Center in Greensburg.
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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
From left: Katya Shaffer of Jeannette, Seton Hill University Performing Arts Center box office manager; Wendy Lynn of Irwin, SHU Popular Fiction program assistant; and Lindsey Martin of Greensburg, SHU book store manager, gather for a photo during the talk and reception with author Kevin Hearne held Tuesday at the SHU Performing Arts Center in Greensburg.

A man walks into the Philadelphia airport and buys a Pittsburgh Pirates cap.

It sounds like the beginning of a joke — or maybe a tragedy, given what we hear about Philadelphia sports fans.

But that’s what urban fantasy novelist Kevin Hearne did on his way from his Arizona home to Greensburg. Luckily, he escaped unscathed and spent a few days working with students in the Seton Hill University Writing Popular Fiction MFA Program.

“I like baseball, I like hats, I have a huge collection of them. I do not own a Phillies hat, though,” Hearne said at a Jan. 8 reception following a talk in the university’s downtown Performing Arts Center.

Hearne talked with students about his writing process, and how he progressed from being “a random English teacher from Arizona following advice I found online” to a New York Times best-selling author for his 2012 novel, “Tricked.”

Having a vampire and a werewolf in his first book didn’t hurt, he said.

And in case anyone was looking for a good read, Hearne listed the three best books he read last year: “The City of Brass” by S.A. Chakraborty, “Empire of Sand” by Tasha Suri and “Kings of the Wyld” by Nicholas Eames.

Following the talk, students and fans queued for a few words, an autograph or a quick photo with Hearne.

Seen were pop fiction program director Nicole Peeler and instructors Scott Johnson, Heidi Ruby Miller, Jason Jack Miller, Timons Esaias and Paul Allen.

Also: Katya Shaffer, Lindsey Martin, Virginia Nelson, Caleb Newman, Jennifer Tillman, Monique Waddel, Emily Daily, Maria Shaffer, Shawn Ewing, Sean Darby, Michelle Brown, Klarisa Loft, Marx Pyle, Victoria Scott, George Galuschak and Holly Harding.


Shirley McMarlin is a
Tribune-Review staff writer.


Shirley McMarlin is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Shirley at 724-836-5750, smcmarlin@tribweb.com or via Twitter .

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