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People magazine names the most stylish stars | TribLIVE.com
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People magazine names the most stylish stars

Tribune-Review
| Wednesday, February 13, 2019 11:52 a.m
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Kacey Musgraves performs “Rainbow” at the 61st annual Grammy Awards on Sunday, Feb. 10, 2019, in Los Angeles.
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Actor Actor Timothee Chalamet poses for photographers upon arrival at the BAFTA awards in London, Sunday, Feb. 10, 2019.

LOS ANGELES (AP) — They are the A-listers who wow on the red carpet.

Ahead of the Academy Awards, People magazine on Wednesday released its list of Hollywood’s most stylish stars.

The magazine calls Lupita Nyong’o a trailblazing beauty and Emma Stone the modern romantic. Nicole Kidman is the elegant icon, Emily Blunt the queen of whimsy and Tracee Ellis Ross is considered avant-garde.

Singer Kacey Musgraves is considered a rule-breaker, Rihanna is a showstopper and Amber Heard is the bombshell.

“Crazy Rich Asians” actress Constance Wu is the fresh face, and the magazine says Julia Roberts has mastered the “less-is-more approach.”

As for men, Timothee Chalamet is considered a trendsetter. Donald Glover’s style is throwback while Jeff Goldblum’s is eccentric. People magazine calls Henry Golding the gentleman.

The magazine is on newsstands Friday.

Categories: Features | Celebrity News
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