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More than 150 animals discovered during eviction in Brookline

| Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016, 3:42 p.m.
Pittsburgh police Officer Christine Luffey, the department's animal liaison,  surveys animal cages as Barbara Yogmas pleads with officials who were removing animals from her home at 748 Bay Ridge Ave. in Brookline on Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Pittsburgh police Officer Christine Luffey, the department's animal liaison, surveys animal cages as Barbara Yogmas pleads with officials who were removing animals from her home at 748 Bay Ridge Ave. in Brookline on Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016.
Pittsburgh Police Officer and the department's animal liaison, Christine Luffey (left) tries to calm down a woman as officials remove animals from her home at 748 Bay Ridge Avenue in Brookline, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016. Allegheny County Sheriff's deputies were serving an eviction notice when they discovered the woman was keeping 150 birds, 14 ferrets, 10 cats, 7 dogs, 2 geckos, 1 bearded dragon, 1 Guinnea pig and 1turtle.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Pittsburgh Police Officer and the department's animal liaison, Christine Luffey (left) tries to calm down a woman as officials remove animals from her home at 748 Bay Ridge Avenue in Brookline, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016. Allegheny County Sheriff's deputies were serving an eviction notice when they discovered the woman was keeping 150 birds, 14 ferrets, 10 cats, 7 dogs, 2 geckos, 1 bearded dragon, 1 Guinnea pig and 1turtle.
A woman watches as officials remove animals from her home at 748 Bay Ridge Avenue in Brookline, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016. Allegheny County Sheriff's deputies were serving an eviction notice when they discovered the woman was keeping 150 birds, 14 ferrets, 10 cats, 7 dogs, 2 geckos, 1 bearded dragon, 1 Guinnea pig and 1turtle.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
A woman watches as officials remove animals from her home at 748 Bay Ridge Avenue in Brookline, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016. Allegheny County Sheriff's deputies were serving an eviction notice when they discovered the woman was keeping 150 birds, 14 ferrets, 10 cats, 7 dogs, 2 geckos, 1 bearded dragon, 1 Guinnea pig and 1turtle.
Cages filled with exotic birds sit on the lawn at 748 Bay Ridge Avenue in Brookline, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016. Allegheny County Sheriff's deputies were serving an eviction notice when they discovered a woman was keeping 150 birds, 14 ferrets, 10 cats, 7 dogs, 2 geckos, 1 bearded dragon, 1 Guinnea pig and 1turtle.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Cages filled with exotic birds sit on the lawn at 748 Bay Ridge Avenue in Brookline, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016. Allegheny County Sheriff's deputies were serving an eviction notice when they discovered a woman was keeping 150 birds, 14 ferrets, 10 cats, 7 dogs, 2 geckos, 1 bearded dragon, 1 Guinnea pig and 1turtle.
Cages filled with exotic birds sit on the lawn at 748 Bay Ridge Avenue in Brookline, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016. Allegheny County Sheriff's deputies were serving an eviction notice when they discovered a woman was keeping 150 birds, 14 ferrets, 10 cats, 7 dogs, 2 geckos, 1 bearded dragon, 1 Guinnea pig and 1turtle.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Cages filled with exotic birds sit on the lawn at 748 Bay Ridge Avenue in Brookline, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016. Allegheny County Sheriff's deputies were serving an eviction notice when they discovered a woman was keeping 150 birds, 14 ferrets, 10 cats, 7 dogs, 2 geckos, 1 bearded dragon, 1 Guinnea pig and 1turtle.
Barba Yogmas, 45, of Brookline is arrested after officials removed nearly 200 animals from her home Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016, in the 700 block of Bay Ridge Avenue in Brookline. Allegheny County Sheriff's deputies were serving an eviction notice when they discovered the animals. While officials have yet to make a full inventory, they said Yogmas was keeping 150 birds, 14 ferrets, 10 cats, seven dogs, two geckos, 1 bearded dragon, one Guinea pig and one turtle.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Barba Yogmas, 45, of Brookline is arrested after officials removed nearly 200 animals from her home Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016, in the 700 block of Bay Ridge Avenue in Brookline. Allegheny County Sheriff's deputies were serving an eviction notice when they discovered the animals. While officials have yet to make a full inventory, they said Yogmas was keeping 150 birds, 14 ferrets, 10 cats, seven dogs, two geckos, 1 bearded dragon, one Guinea pig and one turtle.
Barbara Yogmas, 45, of Brookline is arrested after officials removed nearly 200 animals from her home Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016, in the 700 block of Bay Ridge Avenue in Brookline.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Barbara Yogmas, 45, of Brookline is arrested after officials removed nearly 200 animals from her home Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016, in the 700 block of Bay Ridge Avenue in Brookline.
Cages filled with exotic birds sit on the lawn at 748 Bay Ridge Ave. in Brookline on Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Cages filled with exotic birds sit on the lawn at 748 Bay Ridge Ave. in Brookline on Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016.

The Animal Rescue League scrambled Tuesday to find shelter for more than 150 birds and other animals — including a bearded dragon — that Allegheny County Sheriff's deputies encountered while serving an eviction notice in Brookline.

“This has been the largest intake from one incident that we've ever had,” said Dan Rossi, the rescue league's CEO.

Animal control officers responded at about 11:50 a.m. to the Bay Ridge Avenue home when deputies found 150 birds, 14 ferrets, 10 cats, seven dogs, seven Guinea pigs, three lizards, 2 geckos, one turtle, one hamster and one bearded dragon, Pittsburgh Public Safety spokeswoman Sonya Toler said.

Police took Barbara Tourey, 70, and her daughter, Barbara Yogmas, 45, into custody. A 13-year-old boy was taken into protective custody, Toler said.

Yogmas faces charges of endangering the welfare of a child, cruelty to animals — one count per animal – and harboring of a nuisance, Toler said.

As of Tuesday night, police had not determined whether to charge Tourey.

Rossi said the Animal Rescue League's East End facility isn't large enough to house all the animals. Some will be kept at the Western Pennsylvania Humane Society on the North Side.

Veterinarians were looking over the animals Tuesday night. The animal shelter will begin placing the pets into foster homes in the next few days, Rossi said.

“We need supplies,” Rossi said. “We need extra bird cages, bird food, newspapers and of course monetary donations.”

Court papers were not available online that detailed the circumstances of the eviction. Attempts to reach the Allegheny County Sheriff's Office for comment Tuesday evening were not successful.

Residents of the generally quiet street in Brookline were shocked upon learning about the animal-hoarding situation.

Chris Jamison, 44, who lives across the street, said he never noticed anything unusual about the home where the animals were seized.

“You hear a couple dogs. You hear a couple birds. You think, ‘A couple birds, a couple dogs,'” Jamison said. “And then we hear on the news it's hundreds of animals. ... It's pretty shocking.”

Karissa Millick, 28, often jogs past the home during her daily run. She said she never smelled a foul odor coming from that residence.

“To me, it's surprising,” Millick said. “Just that that many animals were living in that house, probably uncared for.”

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