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This Month In Sports History: December

| Thursday, Dec. 20, 2018, 1:39 p.m.
Guy Lafleur (10) of the Montreal Canadiens cuts in front of Aaron Broten of the New Jersey Devils during third period NHL action at the Meadowlands Arena in East Rutherford, N.J., Dec. 20, 1983.  Lafleur scored his 500th career goal as Montreal beat the Devils 6-0.  (AP Photo/Bill Kostroun)
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Guy Lafleur (10) of the Montreal Canadiens cuts in front of Aaron Broten of the New Jersey Devils during third period NHL action at the Meadowlands Arena in East Rutherford, N.J., Dec. 20, 1983. Lafleur scored his 500th career goal as Montreal beat the Devils 6-0. (AP Photo/Bill Kostroun)
Golden State Warriors' head coach P.J. Carlesimo rubs his face while speaking to the news media at the end of practice Thursday, Dec. 4, 1997, in Oakland, Calif.  Carlesimo and other star players are swamped with questions from reporters upon news that the NBA has suspended Latrell Sprewell from league play for one year as the result of his physical assault on Carlesimo  during team practice on Monday. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Golden State Warriors' head coach P.J. Carlesimo rubs his face while speaking to the news media at the end of practice Thursday, Dec. 4, 1997, in Oakland, Calif. Carlesimo and other star players are swamped with questions from reporters upon news that the NBA has suspended Latrell Sprewell from league play for one year as the result of his physical assault on Carlesimo during team practice on Monday. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
Major League Baseball commissioner Bud Selig speaks during a press conference discussing the Mitchell Report in New York, Thursday, Dec. 13, 2007.    (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Major League Baseball commissioner Bud Selig speaks during a press conference discussing the Mitchell Report in New York, Thursday, Dec. 13, 2007. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
Franco Harris (32) of the Pittsburgh Steelers eludes a tackle by Jimmy Warren of the Oakland Raiders on a 42-yard run to score the winning touchdown in the American Conference playoff game in Pittsburgh, Sunday, Dec. 23, 1972.  Harris' 'Immaculate Reception' came when a desperation pass to a teammate bounced off a Raiders defender.  The touchdown gave Pittsburgh a 13-7 lead with five seconds left in the game.  (AP Photo/Harry Cabluck)
AP_1972
Franco Harris (32) of the Pittsburgh Steelers eludes a tackle by Jimmy Warren of the Oakland Raiders on a 42-yard run to score the winning touchdown in the American Conference playoff game in Pittsburgh, Sunday, Dec. 23, 1972. Harris' 'Immaculate Reception' came when a desperation pass to a teammate bounced off a Raiders defender. The touchdown gave Pittsburgh a 13-7 lead with five seconds left in the game. (AP Photo/Harry Cabluck)
Ohio State's running back Archie Griffin smiles as he poses with the 1975 Heisman Trophy, on December 2, 1975, in New York City. Griffin, who already won in 1974, is the first player to win the prestigious award twice.  (AP Photo)
Ohio State's running back Archie Griffin smiles as he poses with the 1975 Heisman Trophy, on December 2, 1975, in New York City. Griffin, who already won in 1974, is the first player to win the prestigious award twice. (AP Photo)
This is a view from the Giants' side, showing Baltimore colts' fullback Alan Ameche going through a big hole provided by teammates to score the winning touchdown in overtime period at New York's Yankee Stadium, Dec. 28, 1958. Colts' Lenny Moore gets a good block on Giants' Emlen Tunnell (45). Colts quarterback Johnny Unitas (19) is at right along with Giants' Jim Patton (20). Baltimore won, 23-17, for the NFL title. It was the first overtime finish in title history. (AP Photo)
This is a view from the Giants' side, showing Baltimore colts' fullback Alan Ameche going through a big hole provided by teammates to score the winning touchdown in overtime period at New York's Yankee Stadium, Dec. 28, 1958. Colts' Lenny Moore gets a good block on Giants' Emlen Tunnell (45). Colts quarterback Johnny Unitas (19) is at right along with Giants' Jim Patton (20). Baltimore won, 23-17, for the NFL title. It was the first overtime finish in title history. (AP Photo)
O.J. Simpson of the Buffalo Bills (32) goes through the New York Jets line Dec.16, 1973 at Shea Stadium in New York in the first quarter play in which Simpson broke the NFL season rushing record. Also shown are Joe Ferguson (12) and Paul Seymour (87) of the Bills and Phil Wise (27) and John Ebersole (55) of the Jets. (AP Photo)
O.J. Simpson of the Buffalo Bills (32) goes through the New York Jets line Dec.16, 1973 at Shea Stadium in New York in the first quarter play in which Simpson broke the NFL season rushing record. Also shown are Joe Ferguson (12) and Paul Seymour (87) of the Bills and Phil Wise (27) and John Ebersole (55) of the Jets. (AP Photo)
The scoreboard above the crowd in the stands shows the Chicago Bears leading 60-0 against the Washington Redskins early in the fourth quarter in the National Football League championship game at Griffith Stadium in Washington, D.C., Dec. 8, 1940.  The Bears won with the largest score against a team in pro football, 73-0.  (AP Photo)
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The scoreboard above the crowd in the stands shows the Chicago Bears leading 60-0 against the Washington Redskins early in the fourth quarter in the National Football League championship game at Griffith Stadium in Washington, D.C., Dec. 8, 1940. The Bears won with the largest score against a team in pro football, 73-0. (AP Photo)
O.J. Simpson speaks during his sentencing hearing at the Clark County Regional Justice Center in Las Vegas, Friday, Dec. 5, 2008. Sitting right to Simpson is his lawyer Yale Galanter. Simpson was sentenced Friday to at least 15 years in prison for a hotel armed robbery after a judge rejected his apology and said, 'It was much more than stupidity.' (AP Photo/Isaac Brekken, Pool)
ASSOCIATED PRESS
O.J. Simpson speaks during his sentencing hearing at the Clark County Regional Justice Center in Las Vegas, Friday, Dec. 5, 2008. Sitting right to Simpson is his lawyer Yale Galanter. Simpson was sentenced Friday to at least 15 years in prison for a hotel armed robbery after a judge rejected his apology and said, 'It was much more than stupidity.' (AP Photo/Isaac Brekken, Pool)
Navy midshipmen cheer for their team during the second quarter of the 104th Army-Navy football game in Philadelphia, Saturday, Dec. 6, 2003. (AP Photo/Rusty Kennedy)
Navy midshipmen cheer for their team during the second quarter of the 104th Army-Navy football game in Philadelphia, Saturday, Dec. 6, 2003. (AP Photo/Rusty Kennedy)

A look back at sports history in the month of November via the Associated Press archives.

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