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Runway ready: Carnegie Mellon University's annual Lunar Gala fashion event is Feb. 17

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop
| Wednesday, Feb. 7, 2018, 3:36 p.m.
Models walk the runway wearing clothes from the Etats line created by Carnegie Mellon seniors, Joanne Lo and Lynn Kim (not pictured) during the annual Lunar Gala 2017: Sonder, at CMU's Wiegand Gym, Saturday, Feb. 19, 2017. The student-run event is CMU's largest creative showcase, bringing together fashion, dance and video art in a single performance. This year's event is Feb. 17.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Models walk the runway wearing clothes from the Etats line created by Carnegie Mellon seniors, Joanne Lo and Lynn Kim (not pictured) during the annual Lunar Gala 2017: Sonder, at CMU's Wiegand Gym, Saturday, Feb. 19, 2017. The student-run event is CMU's largest creative showcase, bringing together fashion, dance and video art in a single performance. This year's event is Feb. 17.
Models walk the runway during the annual Lunar Gala 2017: Sonder, at CMU's Wiegand Gym, Saturday, Feb. 19, 2017. The student-run event is CMU's largest creative showcase, bringing together fashion, dance and video art in a single performance. This year's event is Feb. 17.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Models walk the runway during the annual Lunar Gala 2017: Sonder, at CMU's Wiegand Gym, Saturday, Feb. 19, 2017. The student-run event is CMU's largest creative showcase, bringing together fashion, dance and video art in a single performance. This year's event is Feb. 17.
Afternoon sunlight lights up Carnegie Mellon University's Wiegand Gym as models walk the runway during the run-through at the annual Lunar Gala 2017: Sonder, Saturday, Feb. 19, 2017. The student-run event is CMU's largest creative showcase, bringing together fashion, dance and video art in a single performance. This year's event is Feb. 17.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Afternoon sunlight lights up Carnegie Mellon University's Wiegand Gym as models walk the runway during the run-through at the annual Lunar Gala 2017: Sonder, Saturday, Feb. 19, 2017. The student-run event is CMU's largest creative showcase, bringing together fashion, dance and video art in a single performance. This year's event is Feb. 17.
Carnegie Mellon University designers Gunn Chaiyapatranun, Shariwa Sharada and Kornrat (Fon) Euchukanonchai work on a garment for the upcoming Lunar Gala on Feb. 17 at the school.
WILSON CHAN
Carnegie Mellon University designers Gunn Chaiyapatranun, Shariwa Sharada and Kornrat (Fon) Euchukanonchai work on a garment for the upcoming Lunar Gala on Feb. 17 at the school.
Carnegie Mellon University student and designer Krista Wilhelm (left) helps fit a model and fellow student for the Lunar Gala to be held Feb. 17 at the school.
ANDREW LEE
Carnegie Mellon University student and designer Krista Wilhelm (left) helps fit a model and fellow student for the Lunar Gala to be held Feb. 17 at the school.
Carnegie Mellon University student and designer Briana Green (right) helps fit a model and fellow student for the Lunar Gala to be held Feb. 17 at the school.
ANDREW LEE
Carnegie Mellon University student and designer Briana Green (right) helps fit a model and fellow student for the Lunar Gala to be held Feb. 17 at the school.

Lunar Gala is a student-run organization at Carnegie Mellon University in Oakland invested in cultivating interdisciplinary creative talent within the community.

This annual fashion event is from 8 to 10:30 p.m. Feb. 17 at Jared L. Cohon University Center, 5032 Forbes Ave.

Originally created in 1997 to ring in the Chinese New Year, Lunar Gala has developed into a much larger production and has become a more impactful organization to the university and Pittsburgh area.

It is one of the largest fashion events in the city having sold out 1,200 seats with 140-plus students involved in producing, designing, modeling and dancing in the show.

In 2017, 17 design teams created nearly 150 looks that incorporated mood sensing Intel chips, zip ties and sheet metal that reflected culture, technology and reactions to current events in society.

This year's theme is Ferox. Ferox is primal. Ferox is chaotic. It is a return to instinct. Embodied by the human species, it represents a blind and reckless freedom that must be contained for the sake of maintaining the civility we all value and from which we all benefit. Ultimately, Ferox must be quelled.

Tickets are $25-$65

Details: lunargala.org

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach her at 724-853-5062 or jharrop@tribweb.com or via Twitter @Jharrop_Trib.

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