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Fashion

NURSE N'AT apparel showcases Pittsburgh pride

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop
| Monday, July 23, 2018, 12:45 p.m.

Nurses work hard every day saving lives.

A lot of what they do is done behind the closed doors of the emergency room and patients’ rooms.

Being able to recognize that dedication is one reason Dena Strano started NURSE N’AT, a company that sells Pittsburgh nurse inspired items from T-shirts to tote bags.

So when people see the words “Pittsburgh Nurse,” written across the garment that can hopefully create some recognition for what these women and men who dedicate their lives to a career go through on a daily basis.

They work holidays and long hours and deal with individuals who aren’t feeling well — that can often be a challenge.

They deserve praise

Nurses should be noticed, Strano says.

“I am super excited to get the word out about NURSE N’AT and I want to add more and more products. This is about the unsung heroes who are making a difference every day. We see babies come into this world and we see people pass away and everything in between. There is a lot of emotion in what we do.”

Strano’s business, she says, is aimed at highlighting and showing appreciation for all Pittsburgh nurses. The goal is to show support and unify all nurses of all areas of care, regardless of health care systems.

She says nurses are taking care of not only the patients, but the friends and family members, often putting their lives on hold or not taking care of themselves like they should.

What you can buy

For the Pittsburgh nurse, there are basic T-shirts – for men and women – as well as sweatshirts and yoga pants emblazoned with “Pittsburgh Nurse,” or items such as “My Mom (or Dad) is a Pittsburgh Nurse” with a heartbeat image and heart design on them. There are tote bags. as well as Pittsburgh Pup bandanas. Moms and dads can buy onesies and shirts for their children. Prices are $10-$27 and available online.

Strano started with a basic T-shirt and has since added additional items, which she plans to continue doing. People are noticing, she says, as other departments in the hospital, such as respiratory therapists, have asked her if there are plans to make items for their area of health care.

“I love Pittsburgh, and I love being a nurse here,” says Strano, a Plum native who now lives in Cranberry. “I wanted to create this line for all nurses regardless of who they work for or their specialty or whether they are an RN or an LPN. The items have really connected with people.”

Who makes them?

Strano contacted Pittsburgh-based Commonwealth Press to help bring her dream to fruition — her goal was to partner with a local company.

“We help bring a person’s idea to life,” says Amanda Gates, custom sales representative for Commonwealth Press. “She gave us her idea and we helped her design the line. It is so cool to see her getting such positive feedback.”

Customers love it

Katie Sampson and her son Josh of Lawrenceville wear the shirts. She has a Pittsburgh Nurse T-shirt and his says “My Mom is a Pittsburgh Nurse.” He says he likes wearing the shirt and is proud of his mom’s profession.

“This is such a great idea,” Katie Sampson says. “It is so nice that Dena is thinking of all nurses. We do what we do because we love helping people. The shirts recognize our calling for the care of our patients.”

They certainly do, agrees nurse April Vandergrift of Hopewell.

“People ask me all the time where I got this shirt,” she says. “They are made of a nice material and they get the message across in a subtle way.”

Details: pghnurse.com

JoAnne Harrop is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact JoAnne at 724-853-5062 or jharrop@tribweb.com or via Twitter @Jharrop_Trib.

Plum native Dena Strano started NURSE N'AT, a company that sells Pittsburgh nurse inspired items from T-shirts to tote bags. Strano, who is a nurse, wants to show appreciation for the dedication of those in her profession. Modeling the shirts are (left) nurse April Vandergrift of Hopewell and Josh Sampson, whose mother Katie is a nurse.
Plum native Dena Strano started NURSE N'AT, a company that sells Pittsburgh nurse inspired items from T-shirts to tote bags. Strano, who is a nurse, wants to show appreciation for the dedication of those in her profession. Modeling the shirts are (left) nurse April Vandergrift of Hopewell and Josh Sampson, whose mother Katie is a nurse.
Plum native Dena Strano started NURSE N’AT, a company that sells Pittsburgh nurse inspired items from T-shirts to tote bags. Strano, who is a nurse, wants to show appreciation for the dedication of those in her profession. Modeling the shirts are nurse April Vandergrift of Hopewell (left) and Josh Sampson, whose mother, Katie, is a nurse.
Plum native Dena Strano started NURSE N’AT, a company that sells Pittsburgh nurse inspired items from T-shirts to tote bags. Strano, who is a nurse, wants to show appreciation for the dedication of those in her profession. Modeling the shirts are nurse April Vandergrift of Hopewell (left) and Josh Sampson, whose mother, Katie, is a nurse.
Plum native Dena Strano started NURSE N’AT, a company that sells Pittsburgh nurse inspired items from T-shirts to tote bags. Strano, who is a nurse, wants to show appreciation for the dedication of those in her profession. Modeling the shirts are (left) nurse April Vandergrift of Hopewell and Josh Sampson, whose mother Katie is a nurse.
Plum native Dena Strano started NURSE N’AT, a company that sells Pittsburgh nurse inspired items from T-shirts to tote bags. Strano, who is a nurse, wants to show appreciation for the dedication of those in her profession. Modeling the shirts are (left) nurse April Vandergrift of Hopewell and Josh Sampson, whose mother Katie is a nurse.
Plum native Dena Strano started NURSE N’AT, a company that sells Pittsburgh nurse inspired items from T-shirts to tote bags. Strano, who is a nurse, wants to show appreciation for the dedication of those in her profession. Nurse April Vandergrift is from Hopewell.
Plum native Dena Strano started NURSE N’AT, a company that sells Pittsburgh nurse inspired items from T-shirts to tote bags. Strano, who is a nurse, wants to show appreciation for the dedication of those in her profession. Nurse April Vandergrift is from Hopewell.
Plum native Dena Strano started NURSE N’AT, a company that sells Pittsburgh nurse inspired items from T-shirts to tote bags to dog bandanas. Strano, who is a nurse, wants to show appreciation for the dedication of those in her profession.
Plum native Dena Strano started NURSE N’AT, a company that sells Pittsburgh nurse inspired items from T-shirts to tote bags to dog bandanas. Strano, who is a nurse, wants to show appreciation for the dedication of those in her profession.
Plum native Dena Strano started NURSE N’AT, a company that sells Pittsburgh nurse inspired items from T-shirts to tote bags. Strano, who is a nurse, wants to show appreciation for the dedication of those in her profession.
Plum native Dena Strano started NURSE N’AT, a company that sells Pittsburgh nurse inspired items from T-shirts to tote bags. Strano, who is a nurse, wants to show appreciation for the dedication of those in her profession.
NURSE N’AT sells Pittsburgh nurse inspired items from T-shirts to tote bags.
NURSE N’AT sells Pittsburgh nurse inspired items from T-shirts to tote bags.
Plum native Dena Strano started NURSE N’AT, a company that sells Pittsburgh nurse inspired items from T-shirts to tote bags. Strano, who is a nurse, wants to show appreciation for the dedication of those in her profession.
Plum native Dena Strano started NURSE N’AT, a company that sells Pittsburgh nurse inspired items from T-shirts to tote bags. Strano, who is a nurse, wants to show appreciation for the dedication of those in her profession.
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