Airbnb looking for 100 of the best home chefs for a trip | TribLIVE.com
Travel

Airbnb looking for 100 of the best home chefs for a trip

Associated Press
1987906_web1_1987906-2fe98792c0574f3486650c2aacfb8df7
AP
Airbnb is launching a global search for 100 top home cooks and treating them to a trip to Italy to learn how to refine their recipes with teachers including Celebrity chef David Chang and his mom.

NEW YORK — Airbnb is launching a global search for 100 top home cooks and treating them to a trip to Italy to learn how to refine their recipes with teachers including David Chang and his mom.

The lucky chosen will travel to the University of Gastronomic Sciences in Pollenzo, Italy, for a week’s worth of workshops and tastings to take their food “to the next level.” Their recipe will also feature in Airbnb’s first cookbook.

Applications open Monday. Airbnb users who are 18 and a resident of one of 30 or so eligible countries can nominate their favorite home cooks and complete an essay. Applications close Dec. 23.

Winners will be selected by judges from representatives from Airbnb, the Slow Food organization and the University of Gastronomic Sciences.

The contest is part of a larger push into food by Airbnb, which also is launching a new program, Cooking Experiences, which connects users with intimate workshops hosted by families, cooks and famers across more than 75 countries.

Local hosts will gather and describe how to use ingredients, welcome users to their home and show them how they put together traditional dishes, from making enchiladas in Ciudad de México, Mexico, to Uzbek dishes in New York City.

“Unlike typical cooking classes, which can feel intimidating or time-consuming, at the heart of every experience is human connection; people coming together to make and share a meal,” Airbnb said in a statement.

Categories: Lifestyles | Food Drink | Travel
TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.