Burger King’s Impossible Whopper may not be vegan friendly | TribLIVE.com
Food & Drink

Burger King’s Impossible Whopper may not be vegan friendly

Frank Carnevale
1507414_web1_1485199-bfe3784e68e14aa19c61dcbaf3705b4b
AP
An Impossible Whopper burger at a Burger King restaurant in Alameda, Calif.
1507414_web1_1134335289
Getty Images
In this photo illustration, an Impossible Whopper sits on a table at a Burger King restaurant on April 1, 2019 in Richmond Heights, Missouri.
1507414_web1_1134335291
Getty Images
In this photo illustration, an Impossible Whopper sits on a table at a Burger King restaurant on April 1, 2019 in Richmond Heights, Missouri.
1507414_web1_1134335297
Getty Images
In this photo illustration, an Impossible Whopper sits on a table at a Burger King restaurant on April 1, 2019 in Richmond Heights, Missouri.

The patties for Burger King’s Impossible Whopper are 100% plant-based, but might not be 100% friendly for vegans or vegetarians.

According to a footnote on the product page for the burger on BK’s website, the Impossible Whoppers are “flame-grilled in the same broiler used for beef and chicken.” Most people following a vegan or vegetarian diet try to avoid animal products in all cooking and preparation of dishes.

Fox News said that Burger King confirmed that the patties will be cooked on the same broilers.

Reps for the company said that customers can ask for the patties to be prepared in the oven. But the product still cannot be labeled vegan as Burger King restaurants “have an open kitchen environment,” according to Fox News.

“We use the same cooking method,” Chris Finazzo, Burger King’s president in the Americas region, told Bloomberg. “This product tastes exactly like a Whopper. We wouldn’t want to lend our name to just anything. It looks like beef, smells like beef, has the same texture as beef.”

Bloomberg reported that the company said 90% of the people who ordered the Impossible Whopper during the trial run were meat eaters, so they may not mind if the plant-based patties are cooked alongside beef ones.

Burger King, which teamed up with Impossible Foods for the patties, will begin selling the plant-based Whopper nationwide Thursday after a successful run in six test regions.

Frank Carnevale is a Tribune-Review digital producer. You can contact Frank via Twitter .

Categories: Lifestyles | Food Drink
TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.