Take your stuffed tomatoes to the next level | TribLIVE.com
Food & Drink

Take your stuffed tomatoes to the next level

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America’s Test Kitchen via AP
The recipe for Hasselback Tomatoes appears in the cookbook “New Essentials.”
1477029_web1_1477029-950607c9bb5a42d4968b74641dd27f63
America’s Test Kitchen via AP
“New Essentials”

Named for the hotel where it was invented in Sweden, Hasselbacking is a technique where a vegetable (traditionally potatoes) is partially sliced, accordion style, brushed with butter, sprinkled with bread crumbs and baked.

This approach is also great for tomatoes; think of them as leveled-up stuffed tomatoes featuring tons of crispy edges and great browning. We started with meaty, well-shaped plum tomatoes.

We cored them, then cut into them and spread a potent, flavorful homemade basil pesto mixed with some crunchy panko bread crumbs over the interiors.

We then topped the tomatoes with shredded Gruyère cheese for added punch and placed the stuffed tomatoes under the broiler for just 5 minutes to melt the cheese and slightly soften the tomatoes without turning them to mush.

For the best results, we recommend buying ripe tomatoes of similar weight and size. We developed this recipe with tomatoes that averaged 3 ounces in weight and 2 ½ inches in length.

Hasselback Tomatoes

Servings: 4-6

Start to finish: 45 minutes

Ingredients

8 ripe plum tomatoes, cored

7 ounces Gruyère cheese, shredded (1 ¾ cups)

1 ½ cups fresh basil leaves

6 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

¼ cup panko bread crumbs

1 garlic clove, minced

Salt and pepper

Directions

Line rimmed baking sheet with aluminum foil and set wire rack in sheet. Using serrated knife, cut ¼-inch-thick slice from 1 long side of each tomato to create a flat base. Turn tomatoes onto cut sides so they sit flat, then slice crosswise at ¼ inch intervals, leaving bottom ¼ inch of each tomato intact.

Process ¾ cup Gruyère, basil, oil, panko, garlic, ½ teaspoon salt and ½ teaspoon pepper in food processor until smooth, scraping down sides of bowl with rubber spatula as needed, about 10 seconds.

Adjust oven rack 6 inches from broiler element and heat broiler. Combine ¾ teaspoon salt and ¾ teaspoon pepper in bowl. Carefully open tomato slices and sprinkle with salt-pepper mixture. Using small spoon, spread basil mixture evenly between tomato slices (about 2 tablespoons per tomato).

Arrange tomatoes on prepared wire rack. Sprinkle remaining 1 cup Gruyère over tomatoes. Broil until cheese is golden brown, about 5 minutes. Serve.

Nutrition information per serving: 286 calories; 218 calories from fat; 24 g fat (8 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 36 mg cholesterol; 414 mg sodium; 6 g carbohydrate; 1 g fiber; 2 g sugar; 11 g protein.

Categories: Lifestyles | Food Drink
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