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Food & Drink

Taste of Westmoreland returning in March for 25th time

Mary Pickels
| Tuesday, Jan. 2, 2018, 1:30 p.m.
Jimmy Pirlo, (R), of Wyano, takes a Texas Roadhouse sample from server, Erin Shirley, at the Congregation Emanu-El Israel's 24th Annual Taste of Westmoreland, held in Chambers Hall at Pitt-Greensburg on Saturday evening, March 12, 2016.
Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
Jimmy Pirlo, (R), of Wyano, takes a Texas Roadhouse sample from server, Erin Shirley, at the Congregation Emanu-El Israel's 24th Annual Taste of Westmoreland, held in Chambers Hall at Pitt-Greensburg on Saturday evening, March 12, 2016.
Prantl's Burnt Almond Torte is a regional favorite. The bakery, which is opening a baking facility and storefront in Greensburg, will participate in the 2018 Taste of Westmoreland on March 10.
PRANTL'S
Prantl's Burnt Almond Torte is a regional favorite. The bakery, which is opening a baking facility and storefront in Greensburg, will participate in the 2018 Taste of Westmoreland on March 10.
Buffalo Wild Wings is returning as one of dozens of food purveyors expected to offer delectable samples when the popular Taste of Westmoreland returns to the University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg on March 10.
Congregation Emanu-El Israel
Buffalo Wild Wings is returning as one of dozens of food purveyors expected to offer delectable samples when the popular Taste of Westmoreland returns to the University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg on March 10.

For 24 years, area residents visited Congregation Emanu-El Israel's Taste of Westmoreland to sample selections from the region's restaurants and caterers.

After a one-year hiatus, the Greensburg synagogue's signature fundraiser — and the county's largest food showcase — will return.

Scheduled for 6 to 8:30 p.m. March 10 at the University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg's Chambers Hall, the event is expected to include up to 30 food purveyors, says chairwoman Karen Chobirko.

The food event has typically drawn 1,000 or more attendees.

People already are calling for tickets — on sale now — and restaurant operators are reaching out to participate, Chobirko says.

“I was very pleased to see there is interest,” she says.

The popular food festival was put on hold for an important reason, Chobirko says.

“Rabbi (Sara) Perman is no longer our rabbi. We were focusing on finding her replacement,” she says.

Perman retired in June after 31 years at the Reform Jewish synagogue.

Rabbi Stacy Petersohn assumed her new duties last summer.

The Taste of Westmoreland's 25th anniversary will include door prizes from area merchants, salons, gift shops and supermarkets, and a large Chinese and silent auction, according to the Congregation Emanu-El Israel website.

Returning participants include Buffalo Wild Wings and Degennaro's Restaurant and Lounge in South Greensburg, while new vendors include Prantl's Bakery, which is opening a baking facility and storefront in Greensburg, and Bean and Baguette.

Individual tickets cost $25, $10 for those 12 and under. Tickets bought in blocks of 10 or more in advance cost $20 each.

They are on sale now from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. weekdays at Congregation Emanu-El Israel, 222 N. Main St., Greensburg.

Tickets will be sold beginning in February at DeGennaro's Restaurant; Giant Eagle stores at Eastgate Shopping Plaza in Greensburg and Mountain Laurel Plaza in Latrobe; Norwin Chamber of Commerce, 321 Main St., Irwin; Rose Style Shoppe, 906 Ligonier St., Latrobe; and Shop ‘n Save locations in Murrysville, Youngwood, Greensburg and Latrobe.

Details: 724-834-0560 or cei-greensburg.org/taste

Mary Pickels is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach her at 724-836-5401 or mpickels@tribweb.com or via Twitter @MaryPickels.

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