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Food & Drink

Turkey Hill 'madness' could net winners a sweet prize

Mary Pickels
| Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2018, 4:28 p.m.
You scream, I scream ...

Norvelt Elementary School students including (front, from left) Haley Phillabaum, 8, Georgia Jordan, 9 and Isaac Brokenbeck, 9; and (back) Kelsey Tressler, 8 and Brandon Wilson, 9, enjoy an ice cream party held there after Georgia won the Pennsylvania Farm Show Detectives Program in January, sponsored by Turkey Hill. Turkey Hill donated more than 400 ice cream cups for the entire school for this 2015 event.
Kelly Vernon | Trib Total Media
You scream, I scream ... Norvelt Elementary School students including (front, from left) Haley Phillabaum, 8, Georgia Jordan, 9 and Isaac Brokenbeck, 9; and (back) Kelsey Tressler, 8 and Brandon Wilson, 9, enjoy an ice cream party held there after Georgia won the Pennsylvania Farm Show Detectives Program in January, sponsored by Turkey Hill. Turkey Hill donated more than 400 ice cream cups for the entire school for this 2015 event.
I scream, you scream, a year's worth of ice cream? It could happen, for Turkey Hill's Ultimate Flavor Tournament winner.
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I scream, you scream, a year's worth of ice cream? It could happen, for Turkey Hill's Ultimate Flavor Tournament winner.
Win Turkey Hill's Ultimate Flavor Tournament and you could quench your thirst with its iced tea for a year.
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Win Turkey Hill's Ultimate Flavor Tournament and you could quench your thirst with its iced tea for a year.
The winner of Turkey Hill Dairy's Ultimate Flavor Tournament could stock their freezer or fridge - if they're big enough - with a lifetime supply of ice cream or iced tea.
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The winner of Turkey Hill Dairy's Ultimate Flavor Tournament could stock their freezer or fridge - if they're big enough - with a lifetime supply of ice cream or iced tea.

Never mind basketball. Turkey Hill is holding its own version of March Madness.

And the winner could walk away with a lifetime supply of ice cream or iced tea.

Offering a take on the popular NCAA event, Turkey Hill offers a tournament pitting flavors against each other to determine the “ultimate” flavor.

The winner will predict all 31 match-ups correctly and win a lifetime supply of ice cream or iced tea, according to a news release.

Entry period for predictions runs through March 31, with the Ultimate Flavor Tournament Sweetest Bracket Edition kicking off on April 2.

If no perfect (or “sweetest”) bracket is predicted, the fan with the most correct predictions will walk away a winner, the release states.

To contest is free to enter.

Details: turkeyhillnation.com

Mary Pickels is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach her at 724-836-5401 or mpickels@tribweb.com or via Twitter @MaryPickels.

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