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Food & Drink

Dig in, it's National Peanut Butter Lovers Day

Mary Pickels
| Thursday, March 1, 2018, 2:48 p.m.
Peanut Butter Surprise Cookies, one of the many delicious ways to celebrate National Peanut Butter Lovers Day.
Submitted
Peanut Butter Surprise Cookies, one of the many delicious ways to celebrate National Peanut Butter Lovers Day.
Ultimate Peanut Butter Brownies. Chocolate and peanut butter is an irresistible combination.
Ultimate Peanut Butter Brownies. Chocolate and peanut butter is an irresistible combination.
Spicy Peanut Butter Glazed Salmon Skewers with Warm Rice Slaw makes a satisfying entree for those who prefer their peanut butter dishes savory.
Submitted
Spicy Peanut Butter Glazed Salmon Skewers with Warm Rice Slaw makes a satisfying entree for those who prefer their peanut butter dishes savory.

Whether combined with your favorite fruit spread in a PB&J, encased in a chocolate candy cup, or layered with bananas in a sandwich Elvis Presley made famous, peanut butter puts a smile - maybe a sticky one - on many a face.

And, of course, there is a day to celebrate peanut butter aficionados.

March 1 is National Peanut Butter Lover's Day .

Elvis was not the only celebrity to express his love for peanut butter.

Some perceive it as the ultimate comfort food.

This little fella finds his peanut butter applause worthy.

Ah, the age-old question:

This tweeter may have a small problem.

Fun Peanut Butter Facts:

• It takes about 540 peanuts to make a 12-ounce jar of peanut butter.

• Peanut butter was first sold in the United States at the Universal Exposition in St. Louis by C.H. Sumner. He sold $705.11 of the "new treat" at his concession stand.

• Reese's Peanut Butter Cup was introduced to America in 1928.

• The oldest operating manufacturer and seller of peanut butter has been selling peanut butter since 1908.

• Peanut butter was the controlling secret behind "Mr. Ed," TV's talking horse.

• Americans spend almost $800 million a year on peanut butter.

(Source: Nationalcalendarday.com)

No bread, no crackers, no apple slices required. Straight out of the jar is many peanut butter lovers' choice.

There's good to the last drop, and then there is going a bit too far.

That's a lot of school lunches.

Add a few raisins for ants on a log.

Just remember to have a beverage on hand. Peanut butter is one of those foods that likes to "stick around" on teeth and gums.

Mary Pickels is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach her at 724-836-5401 or mpickels@tribweb.com or via Twitter @MaryPickels.

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