5 unique features of Mäntylä, Polymath Park’s latest Wright property | TribLIVE.com
Home & Garden

5 unique features of Mäntylä, Polymath Park’s latest Wright property

Mary Pickels

Mäntylä, a Frank Lloyd Wright house now open in Mt. Pleasant Township’s Polymath Park, demonstrates the master architect’s commitment to incorporating nature in his designs.

Natural light streams in from walls of glass and careful placement of windows.

Woodwork and built-in furnishings give a nod to the surrounding forest.

Earth tones — sky blue, terra cotta, beige — blend in, rather than compete with, its Laurel Highlands settings.

Constructed for the Ray and Emma Lindholm family in the early 1950s in Cloquet, Minn., the home was dismantled, transported and reconstructed at the Acme property by Polymath Park CEO Tom Papinchak and a small work crew.

Papinchak and his wife, Heather Papinchak, offer various tour and event options, along with overnight lodging, at Mäntylä, Wright’s Duncan House, which was relocated from Lisle, Ill., and rebuilt on the site in 2007, as well as two homes designed by Wright apprentice Peter Berndston, the Balter and Blum homes.

The use of natural light makes an almost seamless connection between the recent addition’s interior and exterior.

Eye-catching features dominate the home:

Rock formations

As one approaches the house, several miles outside of Mt. Pleasant, the use of boulders makes for a dramatic entrance.

All told, 300 to 400 tons of boulders were placed throughout the property, says subcontracted landscaper Sam Schell. Two rock designs mimic Mäntylä’s angular design, subtly giving arriving guests a small vision of what awaits them.

It all ties in with the property’s organic landscape, Heather Papinchak adds.

Living room

Built-in bookshelves, painted concrete floors, low ceilings and recessed lighting make this room homey and cozy.

Red and blue seat cushions add a few pops of color.

An unobstructed view of the woods outside allows colorful viewing as the seasons change.

Terrace

Except, perhaps, for the winter, visitors likely will feel a pull away from that interior view and move onto the terrace.

Overlooking a gurgling stream, the patio can offer songbird accompaniment to morning coffee and a view of the stars for evening dining and entertaining.

Fireplace

Speaking of winter, and chilly days in spring and fall, guests can up the cozy factor with the working fireplace, a living room centerpiece.

Master bedroom

Cypress paneling and free floating book shelves are featured in a large sleeping area.

On warm evenings, with the windows open, the outside comes inside again, with the stream lulling one to sleep.

Mary Pickels is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Mary at 724-836-5401, [email protected] or via Twitter .


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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
The patio stretches the length of the living room and kitchen, looking out over a water feature toward the surrounding trees.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
A large is a centerpiece of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Mäntylä at Polymath Park in Mt. Pleasant Township.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
The master bedroom with cypress paneling and free floating book shelves looks out over a water feature.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Precisely placed rock formations mimic the angles of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Mäntylä at Polymath Park in Mt. Pleasant Township.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
The living room looks out over a large porch, and into the woods, at Frank Lloyd Wright’s Mäntylä at Polymath Park.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Stunning woodwork includes built-in books shelves and cupboards made of cypress at Frank Lloyd Wright’s Mäntylä at Polymath Park.
1089444_web1_gtr-liv-mantyla010-050319
Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
The living room looks out over a large porch, and into the woods, at Frank Lloyd Wright’s Mäntylä.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
The patio stretches the length of the living room and kitchen, looking out over a water feature towards the surrounding trees, at Frank Lloyd Wright’s Mäntylä at Polymath Park.
1089444_web1_gtr-liv-mantyla002-050319
Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Stunning woodwork includes built in books shelves and cupboards made of cypress at Frank Lloyd Wright’s Mäntylä at Polymath Park.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
A water feature provides a soundtrack for summer sleeping and entertaining on the patio.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Precisely placed rock formations mimic the angles of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Mäntylä at Polymath Park.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Precisely placed rock formations mimic the angles of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Mäntylä at Polymath Park.
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