ShareThis Page
Home & Garden

Tree Pittsburgh collects seed samples at Fallingwater

Doug Oster
| Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016, 7:37 p.m.

Tree Pittsburgh is collecting seeds at Frank Lloyd Wright's iconic house Fallingwater in Fayette County.

The native seeds collected will be taken back to Tree Pittsburgh's Heritage Nursery in Lawrenceville to be prepared for sowing. Most of the resulting seedlings will be used in forest restoration, including a portion sent back to Fallingwater.

“When we are collecting seed, we are trying to collect from trees that are exceptionally old and healthy,” says Megan Palomo, nursery manager for Tree Pittsburgh. “That means they have done really well in our climate and are resistant to the local pest and diseases that can impact our region.”

See the full story at Everybody Gardens .

Megan Palomo, nursery manager for Tree Pittsburgh, collects seeds of witch hazel in front of Fallingwater. She was there to collect seeds from native trees and shrubs. The seeds will be taken to the Tree Pittsburgh Heritage Nursery and grown to use in forest restoration.
Doug Oster | Tribune-Review
Megan Palomo, nursery manager for Tree Pittsburgh, collects seeds of witch hazel in front of Fallingwater. She was there to collect seeds from native trees and shrubs. The seeds will be taken to the Tree Pittsburgh Heritage Nursery and grown to use in forest restoration.
An empty chestnut husk sits in the foreground as Megan Palomo (left), nursery manager for Tree Pittsburgh, and Ann Talarek, Fallingwater horticulturalist, harvest seeds from a chestnut tree. The two were at Fallingwater to collect seeds from native trees and shrubs. The seeds will be taken to the Tree Pittsburgh Heritage Nursery and grown to use in forest restoration.
Doug Oster | Tribune-Review
An empty chestnut husk sits in the foreground as Megan Palomo (left), nursery manager for Tree Pittsburgh, and Ann Talarek, Fallingwater horticulturalist, harvest seeds from a chestnut tree. The two were at Fallingwater to collect seeds from native trees and shrubs. The seeds will be taken to the Tree Pittsburgh Heritage Nursery and grown to use in forest restoration.
Megan Palomo, nursery manager for Tree Pittsburgh, harvests seeds from a native hydrangea at Fallingwater. She was there to collect seeds from native trees and shrubs. The seeds will be taken to the Tree Pittsburgh Heritage Nursery and grown to use in forest restoration.
Doug Oster | Tribune-Review
Megan Palomo, nursery manager for Tree Pittsburgh, harvests seeds from a native hydrangea at Fallingwater. She was there to collect seeds from native trees and shrubs. The seeds will be taken to the Tree Pittsburgh Heritage Nursery and grown to use in forest restoration.
Black gum trees are one of the native varities Megan Palomo, nursery manager for Tree Pittsburgh, was saving seeds from at Fallingwater. She loves the tree for its fall color and seeds which feed the birds. Palomo was there to collect seeds from many different native trees and shrubs. The seeds will be taken to the Tree Pittsburgh Heritage Nursery and grown to use in forest restoration.
Doug Oster | Tribune-Review
Black gum trees are one of the native varities Megan Palomo, nursery manager for Tree Pittsburgh, was saving seeds from at Fallingwater. She loves the tree for its fall color and seeds which feed the birds. Palomo was there to collect seeds from many different native trees and shrubs. The seeds will be taken to the Tree Pittsburgh Heritage Nursery and grown to use in forest restoration.
Donna Fitzpatrick (left), a volunteer at Fallingwater helps Megan Palomo, nursery manager for Tree Pittsburgh, harvest hemlock seeds. Jim Sprowls (right), also a volunteer at Fallingwater, collects seeds, too. The three were at Fallingwater to save seeds from native trees and shrubs. The seeds will be taken to the Tree Pittsburgh Heritage Nursery and grown to use in forest restoration.
Doug Oster | Tribune-Review
Donna Fitzpatrick (left), a volunteer at Fallingwater helps Megan Palomo, nursery manager for Tree Pittsburgh, harvest hemlock seeds. Jim Sprowls (right), also a volunteer at Fallingwater, collects seeds, too. The three were at Fallingwater to save seeds from native trees and shrubs. The seeds will be taken to the Tree Pittsburgh Heritage Nursery and grown to use in forest restoration.
Ann Talarek (left), Fallingwater horticulturalist, harvests seeds from a mature redbud tree with Megan Palomo, nursery manager for Tree Pittsburgh. The two were at Fallingwater to collect seeds from native trees and shrubs. The seeds will be taken to the Tree Pittsburgh Heritage Nursery and grown to use in forest restoration.
Doug Oster | Tribune-Review
Ann Talarek (left), Fallingwater horticulturalist, harvests seeds from a mature redbud tree with Megan Palomo, nursery manager for Tree Pittsburgh. The two were at Fallingwater to collect seeds from native trees and shrubs. The seeds will be taken to the Tree Pittsburgh Heritage Nursery and grown to use in forest restoration.
Fallingwater volunteer Bill Fitzpatrick harvests seeds of witch hazel at Fallingwater. The seeds will be taken to Tree Pittsburgh's Heritage Nursery and used in forest restoration.
Doug Oster | Tribune-Review
Fallingwater volunteer Bill Fitzpatrick harvests seeds of witch hazel at Fallingwater. The seeds will be taken to Tree Pittsburgh's Heritage Nursery and used in forest restoration.
TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me