Company’s job offer: Smoke weed, make $36K a year | TribLIVE.com
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Company’s job offer: Smoke weed, make $36K a year

Chris Pastrick
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This job offer is madness. Reefer madness!

A medical marijuana resource company is looking to pay someone to test a “wide variety of cannabis products and give their unbiased reviews and opinions of the product.”

To be blunt: Smoke weed for a living. Kind of.

American Marijuana posted the $36,000 a year job on its website. But while the company points out the job is “100% for real,” it makes a point of saying the job “includes more than just getting paid to smoke weed. If you think that’s the entire scope of the job, then this might not be for you.”

Each month, whoever is chosen for the job will receive $3,000 along with a shipment of different brands and varieties of cannabis products — from weed strains to vapes, edibles to CBD oils. The person then must write about them, sharing their “honest and reliable insights.”

The worker will need to be OK with being on camera, because they will be required to film unboxing videos and explainer videos of how the products work, as well as their effectiveness.

To get the job, the person will have to be at least 18 years old and live in Canada or a state in the U.S. where medical marijuana is legal. There are 32 states that have made medical marijuana legal, including Pennsylvania; 11 states have made recreational marijuana legal.

You also will need to be in good health (at least when you start the job).

When applying, the American Marijuana would like you to include a bio/resume; a headshot or, better yet, a 60-second video of you talking about your passion for the job; links to your social media accounts; and — this is good — a list of “at least 6 street names, slang terms, or nicknames of marijuana (so we know you’re taking this seriously!).”

Nice.

As the job listing says: “If you think you got the guts to smoke weed every day (plays Snoop Dogg song) and get paid doing it, you might just be the guy we need.”

“Guy”? We’re assuming this is a slip-up — we’re certain a woman would be just as capable.

Chris Pastrick is a Tribune-Review digital producer. You can contact Chris at 412-320-7898, [email protected] or via Twitter .

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