Cool stationery elevates the handwritten note | TribLIVE.com
More Lifestyles

Cool stationery elevates the handwritten note

1716525_web1_1716525-aa1ee71037de49f4a2584309b080e130
Katie Kime via AP
Katie Kime’s vibrant patterns in fresh eye-catching hues have a swingy Palm Springs vibe. The patterns are available in notecards and other accessories.
1716525_web1_1716525-a9d1d66fb88545f2ad17137ecaa9b345
The Stationery Studio via AP
Embossed elements, as well as watercolor prints and other artistic imagery, elevate the handwritten notecard even further. Stationery Studio has a broad selection, and notecards may be monogrammed or otherwise personalized.
1716525_web1_1716525-7c89e019e12947f79ac7cbbb4568c356
Katie Kime via AP
Katie Kime’s vibrant patterns in fresh eye-catching hues have a swingy Palm Springs vibe. The patterns are available in notecards and other accessories.
1716525_web1_1716525-ad14779217ee45a08df6ed4ae8355223
The Stationery Studio via AP
Embossed elements, as well as watercolor prints and other artistic imagery, elevate the handwritten notecard even further. Stationery Studio has a broad selection, and notecards may be monogrammed or otherwise personalized.
1716525_web1_1716525-5d4c06d97e0f4cac8ead1c8aa69a9892
The Stationery Studio via AP
Embossed elements, as well as watercolor prints and other artistic imagery, elevate the handwritten notecard even further. Stationery Studio has a broad selection, and notecards may be monogrammed or otherwise personalized.

We’re all emailing, texting and DM’ing as fast as our thumbs can type these days, but there’s also some Old School pushback. For many style-savvy communicators, handwritten notes are the thing.

Whether it’s a follow-up thank you or a stand-alone communique conveying anything from warmth to wisdom, the humble notecard can rise above life’s digital froth. A thought or two is composed. Pen meets paper. And then the result must be transported. So much more than the pressing of a “send” button, the handwritten note implies effort, and is thus special.

Find your style

Stationery Studio specializes in well-designed notecards. There are hand-illustrated botanical patterns, nautical and sporting motifs, preppy striped designs, and animals. All can be personalized with names or initials in a range of fonts.

At Papyrus, notecards come engraved with tiny sea turtles, hummingbirds, pineapples, vintage airplanes, lightbulbs or gingko leaves.

Art lovers should check out the Museum of Modern Art’s online store, where notecard sets include the works of Matisse, Rothko, Klimt, Calder, Toulouse-Lautrec and Monet. More art cards can be found at other museums’ shops, including that of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, where William Morris prints and Impressionist prints are on offer.

Understated, foil-stamped paper clips and pushpins embellish the notecards at Russel & Hazel, making them ideal for business correspondence.

Austin, Texas, designer Katie Kime’s notecard line has several patterns with a swingy Palm Springs vibe, including Riviera, Greta and Lucy, in color combos like pink and navy and citrus and lime.

Block printing brings an artsy, rustic charm to paper. The Etsy shop JenAitchisonArt has lovely woodland animal and winter forest designs.

Kirsti Scott has been collecting sea glass for years around her home in Capitola, Calif. A graphic designer, she creates art prints as well as notecards, transforming the bits of water-washed glass into flowers, land and sea animals, beach balls, even VW camper buses. She’ll do custom designs as well. Her online shop is EtchedByTheSea.

Seattle studio Of the Earth, or flowerseedpaper.com, prints photos they’ve taken around the Pacific Northwest on homemade paper embedded with seeds like daisy, snapdragon, poppy, thyme and chamomile. When you’re done reading the card, you can pop it into a pot or garden, add a bit of soil and water, and in a couple of weeks your missive will have sprouted.

Want a blank slate to create your own artsy flourish, or to just leave unadorned so your note takes center stage? Paper Source has lustrous gold or silver shimmer-finished cards and matching envelopes. There’s a wide palette of other hues if shine isn’t your thing, as well as cards trimmed with a smart little scalloped edge.

Add accessories

Now that you’ve got your notecards, consider an elevated set of accessories in which to store them. Poltrona Frau’s Zhuang set (the Chinese word means to protect something precious) has a multi-purpose oval box, pen holder and ruler, and a work pad. Containers are made of solid walnut, and all the pieces are covered in rich saddle leather.

David Irwin has designed a tidy collection of Portuguese cork boxes for Case that he calls Trove; they’re available at Design Within Reach.

And at Container Store, there are storage boxes clad in linen-look fabric, lined in faux leather. For cards that are all dressed up, with somewhere to go.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.