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Diamond showroom to open in Downtown Pittsburgh

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop
1919085_web1_PTR-DIAMOND-4
Courtesy of Rothschild Trading Company
The Rothschild Trading Company, a Pittsburgh and Los Angeles-based diamond manufacturer, is celebrating the grand opening of its diamond showroom Downtown.
1919085_web1_PTR-DIAMOND-2
Courtesy of Rothschild Trading Company
The Rothschild Trading Company, a Pittsburgh and Los Angeles-based diamond manufacturer, is celebrating the grand opening of its diamond showroom Downtown.
1919085_web1_PTR-DIAMOND
Courtesy of Rothschild Trading Company
The Rothschild Trading Company, a Pittsburgh and Los Angeles-based diamond manufacturer, is celebrating the grand opening of its diamond showroom Downtown.
1919085_web1_PTR-DIAMOND-3
Courtesy of Rothschild Trading Company
The Rothschild Trading Company, a Pittsburgh and Los Angeles-based diamond manufacturer, is celebrating the grand opening of its diamond showroom Downtown.

The gems sparkle from inside the glass display cases at the Rothschild Trading Company, a Pittsburgh and Los Angeles-based diamond manufacturer, that celebrates the grand opening of its diamond showroom in Downtown Pittsburgh Friday, Nov. 8.

Owner Henry Rothschild rented the space six months ago. The New Orleans native chose the region because his grandfather, Saul Cantor, was from Pittsburgh. Rothschild also studied at The Kiski School, a prep school in Saltsburg.

This new retail location, located at 717 Liberty Ave. in the historic Clark Building, will be the first of its kind in Pittsburgh, according to a news release. Visitors can browse among hundreds of loose diamonds. Rothschild also has a wholesale business upstairs in the same building.

Rothschild said the timing was right with last year’s closing of Goldstock Jewelers, which had been in the Clark Building for decades. His 2,200-square-foot retail space includes a private room for customer consultations.

Doron Lion, a Squirrel Hill native and a diamond buyer for the company, said the company has more loose diamonds than an average jewelry store. One stone is shaped like a horse’s head. There are also three cases of vintage jewelry.

The post-consumer market is growing, Rothschild said. Sometimes people come in with inherited jewelry that they can’t bring themselves to melt down. Rothschild also repairs broken diamonds.

“Every diamond has its own story,” said Rothschild, as he held a 10-carat loose diamond worth $300,000. “Diamonds are in my blood. I’ve been around diamonds all my life. I’ve studied them.”

Founder Efraim “Effie” Rothschild, Henry’s father, started in the diamond business in 1964 at age 12. As described on the company’s website, he apprenticed as a diamond cutter and polisher in Netanya, then emerging as the center of Israel’s diamond industry. Efraim Rothschild still has a diamond business in New Orleans.

“We can offer amazing prices comparable to what you can buy online,” Henry Rothschild said. “And with diamonds, you definitely want to see them and feel them.”

Store hours will be 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact JoAnne at 412-320-7889, [email protected] or via Twitter .

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