Get hooked on some great spots for fly-fishing | TribLIVE.com
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Get hooked on some great spots for fly-fishing

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Check out these five fly-fishing meccas.

Take part in a family fly-fishing adventure and you’ll wake up in some of the country’s most pristine places.

Here are five fabulous places to consider:

1. Jackson Hole, Wyo.: For an extraordinary angling experience, consider an overnight trip on the South Fork of the Snake River. On day one, you’ll hone your skills floating through some of the most coveted water in the western United States. The trip is ideal for a multigenerational outing. Details: worldcastanglers.com; wyomingtourism.org

2. Western Montana: Stunning scenery, diversity of waterways, plentiful fish and an enthusiastic community of guides combine to make Montana a top notch base camp for your fly-fishing adventure. Spend a day on the Madison River with Joe Dilschneider, owner of Ennis, Mont.-based TroutStalkers and your family members will go home with more than basic casting skills. You’ll learn to “match the hatch,” fish pocket water from a raft and how to maximize a day on the famed Madison River. A day on the Yellowstone River, a long stretch of blue-ribbon trout habitat or nearby spring creeks will also make for great memories. Details: visitmt.com, crosscurrents.com; headhuntersflyshop.com

3. Jackson County, N.C.: With more than 3,000 miles of trout streams and 1,100 miles of hatchery-supported trout waters in the mountains alone, North Carolina is a fly-fishing haven. Home to the nation’s only designated fly-fishing trail, the Western North Carolina Fly-Fishing Trail takes anglers to 15 prime spots in the Great Smoky Mountains to cast a line. Designed by two outdoorsmen and fly-fishing guides, the trail is an ideal way for fly-fishers of all skill levels and ages to learn the art of fly-fishing. Details: Flyfishingtrail.com; discoverjacksonnc.com/outdoors

4. Cumberland Valley, Pa.: The Letort Spring Creek, Big Spring Creek and Yellow Breeches Creek, two classic limestone spring streams and one freestone stream are considered “hallowed waters” and have enticed fly fishers to the area since the 1800s. Consider a stay at the Orvis-endorsed Allenberry Resort where fly-fishing packages are offered. The Valley is also home to the Pennsylvania Fly-Fishing Museum. Details: VisitCumberlandValley.com; www.Allenberry.com.

5. Sun Valley, Idaho: This mountain town is perhaps best-known for its famous ski slopes. But the region’s gold-medal waters make for yet another reason to nudge Sun Valley higher on your family vacation list. Tap into the town’s vibrant cultural scene or strap on skates for a whirl around the ice rink at the famed Sun Valley Lodge. Details: visitsunvalley.com; silver-creek.com

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