Nemacolin’s Holistic Healing Center offers well-being journey with latest offerings | TribLIVE.com
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Nemacolin’s Holistic Healing Center offers well-being journey with latest offerings

Mary Pickels
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Lead acupuncturist Alik Minikhanov assists Sarah Berklovich of Perryopolis with the NovoThor photobiomodulation at the Holistic Healing Center.
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Mary Pickels | Tribune-Review
Sarah Berklovich of Perryopolis finds some relief for her back pain through cryotherapy sessions at Nemacolin Woodlands Resort’s Holistic Healing Center.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Sarah Berklovich of Perryopolis undergoes a NovoThor photobiomodulation treatment at the Holistic Healing Center at Nemacolin Woodlands Resort.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Sarah Berklovich of Perryopolis receives a full body CryoTherapy at the Holistic Healing Center at Nemacolin Woodlands Resort.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Sarah Berklovich of Perryopolis receives a NovoThor photobiomodulation treatment at the Holistic Healing Center.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Katlyn Hatcher, resort director of spa and wellness, explains float therapy at The Holistic Healing Center at Nemacolin Woodlands Resort.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
The Holistic Healing Center at Nemacolin Woodlands Resort
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
The Holistic Healing Center at Nemacolin Woodlands Resort offers a full menu of treatments.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Sarah Berklovich of Perryopolis receives a full body CryoTherapy at the Holistic Healing Center.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Lead acupuncturist Alik Minikhanov talks about the different holist treatments offered at the Holistic Healing Center, Nemacolin Woodlands Resort.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Katlyn Hatcher (left), resort director of spa and wellness, prepares Sarah Berklovich of Perryopolis for a full body CryoTherapy at the Holistic Healing Center at Nemacolin Woodlands Resort.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Lead acupuncturist Alik Minikhanov assists Sarah Berklovich of Perryopolis with the NovoThor photobiomodulation at the Holistic Healing Center.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Sarah Berklovich of Perryopolis receives a full body CryoTherapy at the Holistic Healing Center at Nemacolin Woodlands Resort in Fayette County.

All of the fun the holiday season brings — the shopping, the parties, the traveling, the gifts — is often accompanied by an unwelcome visitor: stress.

Eating, sleeping and work schedules tend to be disrupted as we tackle “to-do” lists.

Nemacolin Woodlands Resort’s Holistic Healing Center, along with its spa, offers treatments and therapies to help resort guests and local visitors ease stress year-round, practice self-care and enjoy some pampering.

According to center directors, Eastern medicine meets cutting-edge science through experiences including acupuncture, meditation, yoga and lifestyle coaching.

The center’s most recent additions, its brochure says, include treatments to “bridge the gap of recovery”: full-body cryotherapy, photobiomodulation therapy and float therapy.

Staff members consider an individual’s state of mind, condition of body, quality of lifestyle and choice of goals when suggesting treatments or curating wellness packages.

“It’s really important for us that we are really personalizing that experience for the guest,” says Katlyn Hatcher, resort director of spa and wellness.

“We are not just the physical body. We are not just pain,” says Alik Minikhanov, the Holistic Healing Center’s lead acupuncturist.

The Farmington, Fayette County, resort’s spa also offers several new methods of stress relief, along with pampering, through mindful (virtual reality) facials and, new for the season, a holiday CBD (cannabidiol) massage.

Recover, reinvigorate, relax

In addition to determining how to best benefit a client and meet their needs, the two ensure guests are given tips, directed to apps and otherwise assisted with maintaining stress relief on their own. They recently gave an overview of some of the latest treatments available.

“When we operate in that high stress and we are not taking time to come back down, it affects our relationships, too,” Hatcher adds.

“How can we help our guests not only feel better, but from a holistic viewpoint feel better? And then in turn, being more present and aware and in a calm state of mind allows you to then foster deeper relationships with your family, to get more out of this holiday season, rather than it being so stressful,” Hatcher says.

Holistic treatments can help keep people from operating “on auto-pilot mode,” Minikhanov says.

Dissolving stress

“Our new expansion, our enhancement suite, we brought in to really be — it’s three pieces of equipment: the float therapy, full body cryotherapy and the NovoTHOR PBM (photobiomodulation) therapy. And the idea behind that was really an extension of the healing therapeutic work we are doing on the table,” Hatcher says.

The state-of-the-art equipment offers science-based treatments, the two say.

“We see this equipment as a key component in someone who’s actively pursuing wellness,” Hatcher adds.

Float therapy

“Float therapy has been around a long time, since the ’80s. We’re seeing a surge in popularity,” Hatcher says. “We saw it more as an opportunity to be more thoughtful about, again, looking at it from a holistic viewpoint, how this supplements in to a greater treatment plan.”

Guests float in a sensory deprivation tank containing more than 500 pounds of Epsom salts, starting at 30 minutes and working up to 60-80 minutes, Hatcher says. The water temperatures is set at 95 to 98 degrees.

That salt helps to reduce inflammation, muscle tension and minor aches and pains, as well as achieve deeper sleep, she adds.

Treatment: $105 to $210

Cryotherapy

Whole body cryotherapy

in which guests spend two to three minutes in a chamber set to negative 185 to negative 200 degrees, can improve circulation, Hatcher says.

“This is getting blood flowing to all areas of the body. It can reduce that recovery time. It improves muscle function, muscle recovery,” she adds.

Sarah Berklovich, 29, of Perryopolis says she comes to the holistic health center every 10 days for cryotherapy.

“I have a lot of back pain. I’ve tried massage. This helps, even with sleeping. I’m less restless during the night,” she says.

Guests don socks, slippers, ear muffs and gloves before entering the chamber.

“You start to feel cold, but it’s not what you imagine. It’s different. It’s fun. It makes my back feel better,” Berklovich says.

Treatment: $105 to $110

NovoTHOR PBM Therapy

Berklovich also enjoys this red and infrared whole body light therapy. The 12-minute treatment, the healing center says, uses light (photons) to feed energy to the cells, stimulating cellular regeneration, increasing blood flow and reducing inflammation and pain.

“There is no UV light. It’s the exact opposite of a tanning bed,” Minikhanov says.

“Everyone at any time has some cellular damage going on in their body, whether it’s muscle fatigue, whether it’s an injury, something in their skin, outwardly,” Hatcher says.

“This makes you sleep better, feel better emotionally, you look you more beautiful, produces more collagen … makes sun spots disappear,” Minikhanov says.

“A lot of athletes use it for post-workout recovery. The other prong is health — so, relating to treating pain at the source, rather than masking pain through medication,” Hatcher says.

“Younger generations, specifically millennials, are really interested in wellness — how do I maintain being well? How do I not get to the point of disease or staving off injury? For someone who wants to stay ahead of the curve, there is a lot of opportunity to tweak those processes to avoid getting to the point of injury or sickness,” she says.

Treatment: $75 to $80

Mindful facial

When it’s time for some holiday pampering and beauty treatments, the Woodlands Spa offers two new methods of escapism.

The 80-minute mindful facial uses virtual reality guided meditation, Hatcher says, employing nature-based scenery and instruction on breathing to help achieve calm.

“It’s great for someone who knows (they) can’t relax on the table,” Hatcher says.

The facial includes a dual-action “Smart Defense System” to help strengthen and protect one’s complexion against blue light and modern day toxins, according to the spa brochure.

Cost: $265

Holiday CBD massage

CBD can help reduce inflammation, improve skin health and is soothing, Hatcher says.

The warm oil treatment has proven popular with guests. What CBD will not do is get a person high.

Cost: $275

Mary Pickels is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Mary at 724-836-5401, [email protected] or via Twitter .

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