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Warm and casual Southwest style is hot in decor

Associated Press
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This photo provided by Linda Robinson Design Associates, shows the living/dining room in a Contemporary Santa Fe home in a beautiful equestrian area in the foothills of the mountains in Tucson, Ariz. This was an older home where we designed an extreme remodel incorporating antique chestnut wide board floors, integral color hand applied plaster, viga style beams, eclectic southwestern style furnishings including an antique wood trunk from South America, a pair of antique iron lamps made from a reclaimed balcony rail from Spain, two exceptional antique Navajo rugs and a wonderufl collection of old pueblo pottery and antique Apache baskets.
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Renewed interest in earthy color palettes, rich textures, tribal patterns and rustic elements has sparked a revival of Southwestern decorating style, long associated with homes in New Mexico and Arizona.
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This photo provided by Linda Robinson Design Associates, shows a family room in a contemporary adobe home in Paradise Valley, Ariz. The mud adobe wall and three French windows frame a seating area utilizing a pair of contemporary sofas upholstered in soft terra cotta linen and a sleek steel coffee table in a rich worn iron finish with an antique Navajo rug thrown on top. The furnishings are an eclectic mix of a Spanish iron end table, antique kilim saddlebags made into pillows, an antique Pima basket and an abstract painting by Susan Parker.
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This photo shows a southwestern-inspired geometric, wool pillow from Etsy shop Scout and Whistle. A desert storm is brewing in the design world. Renewed interest in earthy color palettes, rich textures, tribal patterns and rustic elements has sparked a revival of Southwestern decorating style, long associated with homes in New Mexico and Arizona.
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This photo provided by Etsy shows southwestern-inspired pottery in Baton Rouge, La., from Etsy shop Pottery by Osa. A desert storm is brewing in the design world. Renewed interest in earthy color palettes, rich textures, tribal patterns and rustic elements has sparked a revival of Southwestern decorating style, long associated with homes in New Mexico and Arizona.
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This photo provided by Linda Robinson Design Associates, shows a bedroom in an old traditional mud adobe home in Paradise Valley, Arizona. This room has integral colors in the concrete floor in a lovely soft chestnut tone and the french doors open fully access the lush green courtyard with a hand cut cantera stone fountain. The handmade iron four poster bed his natural linen bedcover with an old kilim rug remnant across the foot of the bed and an eclectic assortment of old kilim covered pillows. The antique Persian rug on the floor anchors the antique French chair and antique New Mexican wood trunk.

A desert storm is brewing in the design world. Renewed interest in earthy color palettes, rich textures, tribal patterns and rustic elements has sparked a revival of Southwestern decorating style, long associated with homes in New Mexico and Arizona.

The look is interesting and exciting but also warm and casual, designers say.

“The overarching trend for 2019 is all about being real. It’s about surrounding yourself with nature, including natural fibers and earth tones,” said Dayna Isom Johnson, a trend expert with Etsy.com, the online marketplace that focuses on handmade and vintage goods. That’s a change from 2018, she says, when “it was fantasy, celestial and unicorns,” design inspired by mythology and science fiction.

Warm, natural

Southwestern decor — distinguished by colorful, geometric prints and a palette that includes periwinkle, terracotta, cream and tan — often evokes a desert feel, said Maggie Lydecker, a designer for the online home-goods store, Wayfair.com.

Since many homes are in styles or regions that don’t automatically scream “Southwest,” start with small touches, Isom Johnson suggests. “When a trend happens, you don’t have to deck out your entire home,” she said.

Consider adding a throw to your bed, a rug in your foyer, a piece of pottery on a living room table or new knobs to your kitchen cabinets, she said.

Classic look

Osa Atoe, a potter in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, incorporates geometric patterns and neutral colors with a Southwestern feel in her pottery. The look is classic, she says, and easily fits in different homes. Her pieces are “colorful and neutral at the same time.”

Vanessa Boer of Portland, Oregon, designs Southwestern-inspired housewares. “My shop’s focus is on textiles, primarily pillows, so people are able to add a pop of color or bold pattern on a couch or chair,” she said. “This adds some fun or character without having your entire living room covered in patterns, or feeling so entrenched in a specific style that you feel compelled to redecorate a year later.”

When done right, Southwestern pieces will gel with elements already in your home, Lydecker said.

“The textiles are often layered, which creates a relaxed, inviting ambiance,” she said.

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