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Cure your cabin fever at the Allegheny Outdoor, Sport & Travel Show

| Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018, 4:06 p.m.
Fishing champion Mat Becker will be part of the sport seminars.
Submitted
Fishing champion Mat Becker will be part of the sport seminars.
Joe Floriolli of Rivers Edge, Leechburg, fishing team​
Submitted
Joe Floriolli of Rivers Edge, Leechburg, fishing team​

Neill Andritz says he has the cure for even the worst cases of cabin fever.

It's the 33rd Annual Allegheny Outdoor, Sport & Travel Show Feb. 16-18 at Monroeville Convention Center.

“It gets people excited for spring and the outdoor adventures to come,” says the Avonmore resident who, with wife Evelyn Andritz, owns and operates River's Edge Canoe and Kayak, based in the Leechburg area on the Kiski River. This is their eighth year in the show.

“We love the awesome variety that it offers on all things outdoors,” he says. “The vendors here really strive to create a fun family atmosphere. It gives us an opportunity to share our passion for paddle sports and the outdoors.

The company sells and rents river equipement.

One-stop shop

The show is a once-a-year, one-stop opportunity to talk to fishing, hunting and travel-related experts, says Chris Fassnacht, show manager.

“All the seminars are totally exclusive to our show and not seen anywhere else in Southwestern PA,” he says.

In addition to being able to see and buy the newest fishing and hunting equipment, visitors can plan a vacation with exhibitors from Alaska to Canada to Africa. Kids get in free and can enjoy the trout pond, gold panning and wild world of animal show.

Trending

Among new activities this year is “Destination Unknown Virtual Reality,” a family-owned and operated mobile virtual reality gaming company.

“It is the most state of the art virtual reality experience with different scenarios from around the world,” Fassnacht says.

He anticipates that the Safari Club seminar on how to plan a photographic or hunting safari also will be a highlight of the weekend.

“The show is a great place to visit with friends and family,” says Tom Schimizzi, owner of Hillview Motorsports, Unity, in its fifth year at the event. “We display the latest Yamaha and Suzuki ATVs and Side by Sides. We have met a lot of great customers at the show, which has led to a lot of repeat customers and sales.”

Sharing deer

Hunters Sharing the Harvest, a nonprofit charity working to reduce hunger, returns Feb. 17 for the second year. Money is raised for various food banks, there's a cooking demonstration and visitors learn how participating hunters can share their extra venison, through a network of butchers, to food banks across Pennsylvania.

One average deer can provide 200 meals. For every $25 donated, enough ground venison for 100 meals can be processed. Details: sharedeer.org

Rex Rutkoski is a Tribune-Review staff writer.

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