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Gulf Tower to light up in Welsh hues celebrating St. David's Day

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop
| Tuesday, Feb. 27, 2018, 4:22 p.m.
The Gulf Tower, seen here in Downtown, Sunday, Nov. 15, 2015, is illuminated red, white, and blue in recognition of the terror attacks that recently happened in Paris. It  will be lit up in red, green and white on March 1 in celebration of St. David’s Day, a traditional Welsh holiday honoring St. David, the patron saint of Wales.
Philip G. Pavely | Trib Total Media
The Gulf Tower, seen here in Downtown, Sunday, Nov. 15, 2015, is illuminated red, white, and blue in recognition of the terror attacks that recently happened in Paris. It will be lit up in red, green and white on March 1 in celebration of St. David’s Day, a traditional Welsh holiday honoring St. David, the patron saint of Wales.
The Gulf Tower, Downtown, lights up black and gold to coincide with the Pirates scoring and wins.  It  will be lit up in red, green and white on March 1 in celebration of St. David’s Day, a traditional Welsh holiday honoring St. David, the patron saint of Wales.
Tribune-Review
The Gulf Tower, Downtown, lights up black and gold to coincide with the Pirates scoring and wins. It will be lit up in red, green and white on March 1 in celebration of St. David’s Day, a traditional Welsh holiday honoring St. David, the patron saint of Wales.

The Gulf Tower in Pittsburgh will be lit up in red, green and white on March 1 in celebration of St. David's Day, a traditional Welsh holiday honoring St. David, the patron saint of Wales. The lights will match the colors of the Welsh flag, which incorporates white and green and has a red dragon.

In recognition of the large number of people who settled in the commonwealth from Wales during the 19th century, Rep. Harry A. Readshaw introduced legislation (House Resolution 695) that would declare March 1, 2018 as “Saint David's Day” in the state of Pennsylvania.

The St. David's Society of Pittsburgh, a charitable organization that celebrates, preserves and promotes Welsh cultural heritage in Southwestern Pennsylvania, is hosting its 19th annual St. David's Day Pub Crawl from 5-11 p.m. March 2, beginning at Olive or Twist,140 Sixth St., in Pittsburgh.

The annual St. David's Day Daffodil luncheon is at noon March 3 in the Pine Community Center in Wexford. And there is a 12-week session of Welsh language classes which begin March 14 in the Cathedral of Learning at the University of Pittsburgh in Oakland.

Details: stdavidssociety.org

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach her at 724-853-5062 or jharrop@tribweb.com or via Twitter @Jharrop_Trib.

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