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Carnegie Science Center's Lego exhibit showcases the Art of the Brick

| Friday, June 15, 2018, 4:09 p.m.

World-renowned Lego artist Nathan Sawaya has reinterpreted a beloved icon of Steel City architecture in celebration of the Pittsburgh opening of The Art of the Brick at Carnegie Science Center's new PPG Science Pavilion.

The exhibition featuring intriguing works of art made exclusively Lego bricks. Sawaya joined Carnegie Science Center Co-Directors Ann Metzger and Ron Baillie on Friday to unveil a Lego sculpture created by Sawaya just for this exhibition. The sculpture — “Perspective on Three Sisters Bridges” — was inspired by the Roberto Clemente, Andy Warhol, and Rachel Carson bridges. It measures 46” x 67” x 45” and contains 12,380 Lego bricks, according to a news release.

The Art of the Brick, which opens to the public June 16, features 100 creative and inspiring sculptures and is on display through Jan. 7, 2019. It is the first major museum exhibition to use Lego bricks as the sole art medium. Sawaya transforms them into tremendous and thought-provoking sculptures, elevating the toy to the realm of art. Sawaya's ability to transform this common toy into something meaningful, his devotion to spatial perfection, and the way he conceptualizes action, enables him to elevate what almost every child has played with into the status of contemporary art.

World-Renowned Lego artist Nathan Sawaya poses for a photo with his newest Pittsburgh inspired piece called  'Perspective on Three Sisters Bridges' at the debut of his exhibition at the Carnegie Science Center called 'The Art of the Brick' Friday, June 15, 2018.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
World-Renowned Lego artist Nathan Sawaya poses for a photo with his newest Pittsburgh inspired piece called 'Perspective on Three Sisters Bridges' at the debut of his exhibition at the Carnegie Science Center called 'The Art of the Brick' Friday, June 15, 2018.
World-Renowned Lego artist Nathan Sawaya talks about the inspiration for his work at the debut of his exhibition at the Carnegie Science Center called 'The Art of the Brick' Friday, June 15, 2018.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
World-Renowned Lego artist Nathan Sawaya talks about the inspiration for his work at the debut of his exhibition at the Carnegie Science Center called 'The Art of the Brick' Friday, June 15, 2018.
World-Renowned Lego artist Nathan Sawaya talks about his most famous piece titled 'Yellow' at the debut of his exhibition at the Carnegie Science Center called 'The Art of the Brick' Friday, June 15, 2018.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
World-Renowned Lego artist Nathan Sawaya talks about his most famous piece titled 'Yellow' at the debut of his exhibition at the Carnegie Science Center called 'The Art of the Brick' Friday, June 15, 2018.
World-Renowned Lego artist Nathan Sawaya talks about the inspiration for his work at the debut of his exhibition at the Carnegie Science Center called 'The Art of the Brick' Friday, June 15, 2018.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
World-Renowned Lego artist Nathan Sawaya talks about the inspiration for his work at the debut of his exhibition at the Carnegie Science Center called 'The Art of the Brick' Friday, June 15, 2018.
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