ShareThis Page
More Lifestyles

Author of Mister Rogers book to speak at Heinz History Center

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop
| Tuesday, Aug. 21, 2018, 2:33 p.m.
The Senator John Heinz History Center in the Strip District will welcome author and Pittsburgh Foundation CEO Maxwell King to its neighborhood for the book launch of “The Good Neighbor: The Life and Works of Fred Rogers.” This history center is home to the largest collection of original artifacts from the “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood” televsion set on public view, including the Great Oak Tree and King Friday XII’s Castle.
The Senator John Heinz History Center in the Strip District will welcome author and Pittsburgh Foundation CEO Maxwell King to its neighborhood for the book launch of “The Good Neighbor: The Life and Works of Fred Rogers.” This history center is home to the largest collection of original artifacts from the “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood” televsion set on public view, including the Great Oak Tree and King Friday XII’s Castle.
The Senator John Heinz History Center in the Strip District will welcome author and Pittsburgh Foundation CEO Maxwell King to its neighborhood for the book launch of “The Good Neighbor: The Life and Works of Fred Rogers.”
The Senator John Heinz History Center in the Strip District will welcome author and Pittsburgh Foundation CEO Maxwell King to its neighborhood for the book launch of “The Good Neighbor: The Life and Works of Fred Rogers.”

The Senator John Heinz History Center in the Strip District will welcome author and Pittsburgh Foundation CEO Maxwell King to its neighborhood for the book launch of “The Good Neighbor: The Life and Works of Fred Rogers” (Adams Press), the first full-length biography of Mister Rogers at 7 p.m. Sept. 4.

As the world marks 50 years since the national television debut of “Mister Rogers Neighborhood,” King’s book paints the definitive portrait of an American icon that changed children’s television forever.

Drawing on original interviews, oral histories and archival documents, King traces Rogers’ personal, professional and artistic life through decades of work, from childhood stories and relationships with his family to the role religion played in his work, his close collaboration with leading childhood development experts, and his attempt to make television for adults.

As part of the book launch, King will discuss his work on “The Good Neighbor” and the legacy of Rogers with history center president and CEO Andy Masich.

King will also sign copies of the book which will be available for purchase.

Admission includes after-hours access to all six floors of the museum, including the “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood” exhibtion. It features the largest collection of original artifacts from the “Mister Rogers Neighborhood” television set on public view, including the entryway and living room set that Mister Rogers walked through to begin each show, as well as King Friday XIII’s Castle, the Great Oak Tree, and Mr. McFeely’s “Speedy Delivery” tricylcle.

Tickets are $15, $45 for expanded admission (available until Aug. 31), which includes a signed copy of “The Good Neighbor.”

Details: http://heinzhistorycenter.org

JoAnne Harrop is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact JoAnne at 724-853-5062 or jharrop@tribweb.com or via Twitter @Jharrop_Trib.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me