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Youngwood celebrates new town clock with dedication ceremony

Mary Pickels
| Friday, Oct. 12, 2018, 1:33 a.m.
Former Youngwood councilwoman and Youngwood Area Revitalization and Development President Mary Ann Klingensmith looks upward at  the borough’s new town clock. The clock will be unveiled during a public dedication Oct. 13.
Former Youngwood councilwoman and Youngwood Area Revitalization and Development President Mary Ann Klingensmith looks upward at the borough’s new town clock. The clock will be unveiled during a public dedication Oct. 13.
Engraved pavers, sold at $200 each, helped to raise funds for Youngwood’s new town clock.
Engraved pavers, sold at $200 each, helped to raise funds for Youngwood’s new town clock.
Engraved pavers still are available to be placed at the patio area of the new Youngwood clock. The clock will make its debut and be dedicated during a public program at noon on Oct. 13.
Engraved pavers still are available to be placed at the patio area of the new Youngwood clock. The clock will make its debut and be dedicated during a public program at noon on Oct. 13.
Shown is a paver placed at the site of the new Youngwood town clock patio area. The clock, a Youngwood Area Revitalization and Development project, will be dedicated on Oct. 13.
Shown is a paver placed at the site of the new Youngwood town clock patio area. The clock, a Youngwood Area Revitalization and Development project, will be dedicated on Oct. 13.

Watches, cellphones and car radios all help us keep track of the time.

Residents and motorists driving through Youngwood will soon have a new, double-faced timepiece, as a new town clock is unveiled Saturday.

The noon dedication is open to the public and will be followed with a brief reception, says Mary Ann Klingensmith, president of Youngwood Area Revitalization and Development.

A YARD project, the clock will stand in the borough parklet at the corner of Depot and Fourth streets.

Through the sale of Christmas ornaments, crafts, cookbooks, engraved pavers, plaque sponsors and donations, the clock committee raised enough money to pay for the $22,600 project, Klingensmith says.

A 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Nov. 4 “Crafts for the Clock” sale at the Youngwood fire hall will help raise funding for future maintenance, she says.

Members of the borough’s seven churches and the fire department ladies auxiliary contributed recipes for “Our Moment In Time, Breaking Bread With Family and Friends.” Copies are sold in borough businesses and will be available at the craft sale for $10, Klingensmith says.

“This is our second cookbook,” she says.

The idea for a town clock started less than two years ago, when YARD members met to discuss a community project.

“That’s when one of our members, Eric Trout, said that his (late) mother, Dolores Tompkins Trout, a longtime resident, mentioned that it would be nice to have a clock in the park,” Klingensmith says.

“She was our inspiration. We never would have thought of doing a project this large,” she says.

Then a borough councilwoman, Klingensmith presented the idea to council as a project YARD would fund.

The committee selected the Verdin Co. of Cincinnati, Ohio, as the clock provider.

Funding the project led to the ideas of inviting benefactors to make contributions in exchange for a listing on a bronze plaque and offering engraved pavers for a $200 contribution.

Klingensmith is taking orders for “a few more” pavers, she says, and can be reached at 724-925-2480.

The two-sided clock, which proudly proclaims “Youngwood” across the top, will light up at night.

“We are excited. … We were able to pull it off. We are proud of it. We didn’t do it ourselves — the people who supported, contributed, made suggestions,” all made the project possible, Klingensmith says.

“You will always know what time it is in Youngwood,” she says.

Mary Pickels is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Mary at 724-836-5401, mpickels@tribweb.com or via Twitter @MaryPickels.

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