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Out & About: Traveling exhibition brings 19th-century masterpieces to Greensburg museum

Shirley McMarlin
| Sunday, March 6, 2016, 9:00 p.m.
(from left), Bill and Cindy Swartz, of Ligonier, join Kevin O'Toole, during the opening reception for 'Telling Tales: Stories and Legends in 19th-century American Art', held at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg on Saturday evening, March 5, 2016.
Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
(from left), Bill and Cindy Swartz, of Ligonier, join Kevin O'Toole, during the opening reception for 'Telling Tales: Stories and Legends in 19th-century American Art', held at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg on Saturday evening, March 5, 2016.
The Snyder family, Jim, Mike and Jane, all of Greensburg, admire works of art during the opening reception for 'Telling Tales: Stories and Legends in 19th-century American Art', held at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg on Saturday evening, March 5, 2016.
Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
The Snyder family, Jim, Mike and Jane, all of Greensburg, admire works of art during the opening reception for 'Telling Tales: Stories and Legends in 19th-century American Art', held at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg on Saturday evening, March 5, 2016.
(from right), Judith Hansen O’Toole, the Richard M. Scaife Director/CEO of the Westmoreland Museum of American Art, joins Linda Blum, of Greensburg, and Arlene Kendra, of Greensburg, at the opening reception for 'Telling Tales: Stories and Legends in 19th-century American Art', held at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg on Saturday evening, March 5, 2016.
Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
(from right), Judith Hansen O’Toole, the Richard M. Scaife Director/CEO of the Westmoreland Museum of American Art, joins Linda Blum, of Greensburg, and Arlene Kendra, of Greensburg, at the opening reception for 'Telling Tales: Stories and Legends in 19th-century American Art', held at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg on Saturday evening, March 5, 2016.
(from left), John and Kathy Hayes, of New Florence, admire the art at the opening reception for 'Telling Tales: Stories and Legends in 19th-century American Art', held at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg on Saturday evening, March 5, 2016.
Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
(from left), John and Kathy Hayes, of New Florence, admire the art at the opening reception for 'Telling Tales: Stories and Legends in 19th-century American Art', held at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg on Saturday evening, March 5, 2016.
(from right), Corey and Lauren Churilla, of Murrysville, admire works of art at the opening reception for 'Telling Tales: Stories and Legends in 19th-century American Art', held at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg on Saturday evening, March 5, 2016.
Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
(from right), Corey and Lauren Churilla, of Murrysville, admire works of art at the opening reception for 'Telling Tales: Stories and Legends in 19th-century American Art', held at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg on Saturday evening, March 5, 2016.
(from left), Betty Hansen, of Greensburg, and her daughter and son-in-law, Cindy and Matthew Guntharp, of Lancaster, gather for a photo at the opening reception for 'Telling Tales: Stories and Legends in 19th-century American Art', held at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg on Saturday evening, March 5, 2016.
Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
(from left), Betty Hansen, of Greensburg, and her daughter and son-in-law, Cindy and Matthew Guntharp, of Lancaster, gather for a photo at the opening reception for 'Telling Tales: Stories and Legends in 19th-century American Art', held at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg on Saturday evening, March 5, 2016.
(from left), Julie Horowitz and Richard Burkert, of Johnstown, admire the art at the opening reception for 'Telling Tales: Stories and Legends in 19th-century American Art', held at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg on Saturday evening, March 5, 2016.
Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
(from left), Julie Horowitz and Richard Burkert, of Johnstown, admire the art at the opening reception for 'Telling Tales: Stories and Legends in 19th-century American Art', held at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg on Saturday evening, March 5, 2016.
(from left), Frank and Sharon Klapak, of Greensburg, stop for a photo, during the opening reception for 'Telling Tales: Stories and Legends in 19th-century American Art', held at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg on Saturday evening, March 5, 2016.
Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
(from left), Frank and Sharon Klapak, of Greensburg, stop for a photo, during the opening reception for 'Telling Tales: Stories and Legends in 19th-century American Art', held at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg on Saturday evening, March 5, 2016.
(from right), Jeff and Rose Hydeman, of Murrysville, at the opening reception for 'Telling Tales: Stories and Legends in 19th-century American Art', held at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg on Saturday evening, March 5, 2016.
Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
(from right), Jeff and Rose Hydeman, of Murrysville, at the opening reception for 'Telling Tales: Stories and Legends in 19th-century American Art', held at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg on Saturday evening, March 5, 2016.
(from left), Suzanne Wright and Barbara Ferrier, join Westmoreland Museum of American Art Chief Curator, Barbara L. Jones during the opening reception for 'Telling Tales: Stories and Legends in 19th-century American Art', held at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg on Saturday evening, March 5, 2016.
Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
(from left), Suzanne Wright and Barbara Ferrier, join Westmoreland Museum of American Art Chief Curator, Barbara L. Jones during the opening reception for 'Telling Tales: Stories and Legends in 19th-century American Art', held at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg on Saturday evening, March 5, 2016.
(from right), Craig and Victoria Faris, of Greensburg, pose for a photo at the opening reception for 'Telling Tales: Stories and Legends in 19th-century American Art', held at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg on Saturday evening, March 5, 2016.
Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
(from right), Craig and Victoria Faris, of Greensburg, pose for a photo at the opening reception for 'Telling Tales: Stories and Legends in 19th-century American Art', held at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg on Saturday evening, March 5, 2016.
(from left), John and Kathy Hayes, of New Florence, admire the art at the opening reception for 'Telling Tales: Stories and Legends in 19th-century American Art', held at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg on Saturday evening, March 5, 2016.
Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
(from left), John and Kathy Hayes, of New Florence, admire the art at the opening reception for 'Telling Tales: Stories and Legends in 19th-century American Art', held at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg on Saturday evening, March 5, 2016.

Judy O'Toole is excited about “Telling Tales: Stories and Legends in 19th-Century American Art,” the new exhibition at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg.

At a March 5 opening reception, the museum's Richard M. Scaife director and CEO listed a number of reasons for the buzz.

“This is our first traveling exhibition since the new building has opened,” she said, noting that the featured works come from the expansive collection of the New York Historical Society, based in New York City.

“It contains a lot of their masterpieces from the 19th century, and (chief curator) Barbara (Jones) has done a wonderful job hanging it,” she continued. “It's visually very beautiful.

“I think it will be very popular.”

Visitors have until June 19 to see what the exhibition guide describes as works that “recount stories relating to American cultural aspirations and everyday life.” A number of gallery talks are planned in conjunction with the show.

Notable artists represented include painters Thomas Cole, Asher B. Durand, William Sydney Mount and Benjamin West and sculptor John Rogers.

Reception-goers browsed the gallery to the strains of the Three Rivers String Quartet.

Light fare was provided by J Corks of Greensburg and the evening's sponsor was Rivertowne Brewing of Export.

Spending a night at the museum:Kevin O'Toole, Betty Hansen, Matthew andCindy Guntharp, Frank and Sharon Klapak, Linda Blum, Anita Manoli, Chris andBonnie Marsh, Jeff and Rose Hydeman, Rowan andMary Reid, Shirleah andKeith Kelly, Victoria and Craig Faris, Bob and Arlene Kendra, Harry and Donna Morrison, Barbara Ferrier, Duncan MacDiarmid, Pauline Douglas, Eileen Werner, Lauren and Corey Churilla and John and Kathy Hayes.

Shirley McMarlin is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach her at 724-836-5750 or smcmarlin@tribweb.com.

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