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Out & About: Sabika jewelry raises funds for CASA of Westmoreland

Dawn Law
| Sunday, April 16, 2017, 9:00 p.m.
(from left), Miriam Mayr, Mandy Zalich, CASA of Westmoreland Executive Director, Sherrie Dunlap, CASA of Westmoreland Director of Development, and Karin Mayr, Sabika founder and CEO, gather for a photo during the Sabikakids Party, hosted by CASA of Westmoreland, held at the Palace Theatre Megan Suite in Greensburg on Thursday afternoon, April 13, 2017.
Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
(from left), Miriam Mayr, Mandy Zalich, CASA of Westmoreland Executive Director, Sherrie Dunlap, CASA of Westmoreland Director of Development, and Karin Mayr, Sabika founder and CEO, gather for a photo during the Sabikakids Party, hosted by CASA of Westmoreland, held at the Palace Theatre Megan Suite in Greensburg on Thursday afternoon, April 13, 2017.
(from left), Sharon Casario, of Greensburg, and Marlene Helinski, of Greensburg, shop with Sabika Field Services Manager, Jeannine Welsh, during the Sabikakids Party, hosted by CASA of Westmoreland, held at the Palace Theatre Megan Suite in Greensburg on Thursday afternoon, April 13, 2017.
Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
(from left), Sharon Casario, of Greensburg, and Marlene Helinski, of Greensburg, shop with Sabika Field Services Manager, Jeannine Welsh, during the Sabikakids Party, hosted by CASA of Westmoreland, held at the Palace Theatre Megan Suite in Greensburg on Thursday afternoon, April 13, 2017.
(from left), Sabika Director, Lisa Alfery, CASA board member, Rosemary Spoljarick, and Sabika Director, Tarah Kurimsky, pose for a photo, during the Sabikakids Party, hosted by CASA of Westmoreland, held at the Palace Theatre Megan Suite in Greensburg on Thursday afternoon, April 13, 2017.
Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
(from left), Sabika Director, Lisa Alfery, CASA board member, Rosemary Spoljarick, and Sabika Director, Tarah Kurimsky, pose for a photo, during the Sabikakids Party, hosted by CASA of Westmoreland, held at the Palace Theatre Megan Suite in Greensburg on Thursday afternoon, April 13, 2017.
(from left), Sabika Director, Lisa Alfery, Sabika Consultant, Rachel King, Sabika Director, Tarah Kurimsky, and Sabika Consultant, Brenda Lebe, pose for a photo, during the Sabikakids Party, hosted by CASA of Westmoreland, held at the Palace Theatre Megan Suite in Greensburg on Thursday afternoon, April 13, 2017.
Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
(from left), Sabika Director, Lisa Alfery, Sabika Consultant, Rachel King, Sabika Director, Tarah Kurimsky, and Sabika Consultant, Brenda Lebe, pose for a photo, during the Sabikakids Party, hosted by CASA of Westmoreland, held at the Palace Theatre Megan Suite in Greensburg on Thursday afternoon, April 13, 2017.
(from left), CASA volunteer, Mary Lou Hugus, and Anita Welty, try on some of the Sabika jewelry pieces, during the Sabikakids Party, hosted by CASA of Westmoreland, held at the Palace Theatre Megan Suite in Greensburg on Thursday afternoon, April 13, 2017.
Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
(from left), CASA volunteer, Mary Lou Hugus, and Anita Welty, try on some of the Sabika jewelry pieces, during the Sabikakids Party, hosted by CASA of Westmoreland, held at the Palace Theatre Megan Suite in Greensburg on Thursday afternoon, April 13, 2017.
(from left), Mimi Brooker, of Hempfield Township, shops for Sabika jewelry, during the Sabikakids Party, hosted by CASA of Westmoreland, held at the Palace Theatre Megan Suite in Greensburg on Thursday afternoon, April 13, 2017.
Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
(from left), Mimi Brooker, of Hempfield Township, shops for Sabika jewelry, during the Sabikakids Party, hosted by CASA of Westmoreland, held at the Palace Theatre Megan Suite in Greensburg on Thursday afternoon, April 13, 2017.

At the CASA of Westmoreland Sabikakids fundraiser April 13 at the Palace Theatre in Greensburg, 50 percent of Sabika sales were donated to CASA, the Court Appointed Special Advocates who provide assistance to abused or neglected children in the family court system.

Sabika founder and CEO Karin Mayr was 50 in 2001 when she founded Sabika, a direct sales jewelry company headquartered in Robinson, after becoming disillusioned with working in a male-dominated fashion industry.

“I wasn't heard,” Mayr said. “I wanted a company where people have a say.”

She now finds strength through empowering others.

Women artisans hand-create Sabika pieces and independent consultants sell them, sometimes raking in six figures with flexible schedules that allow plenty of time for family.

Daughter Miriam Mayr often models the product and is manager of sales. Daughter Alexandra Mayr-Gracik designed the Little Hearts Sabika Daisy Collection, and during Child Abuse Prevention Month in April, Sabika donates $15 from each sale to child abuse prevention programs.

Karin Mayr — at the CASA event with her husband, Konrad — said her generosity sometimes gives her accountant a headache. But offering opportunities to others helps heal her painful past of hunger and abuse growing up in Austria and Germany, when her only respite was an occasional visit with her grandmother Frieda, who lived far away.

Mayr's happiest times during childhood were spent with her grandmother in her flower garden. Those memories now represent hope, explaining why flowers have been incorporated into Sabika designs.

“I swear she comes to me in a flower,” Mayr said. “I always wanted to help people in my place.”

Seen: CASA executive director Mandy Zalich and development director Sherrie Dunlap, Lisa Hegedus, Rosemary Spoljarick, Beth Teacher, Mary Lou Hugus, Mitchell Samick, Janelle Mathe and Meredith King.

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