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Out & About

Out & About: Open House at the Foster and Muriel McCarl Coverlet Gallery

Shirley McMarlin
| Sunday, July 2, 2017, 9:00 p.m.
(from left), Curator, Lauren Churilla, joins collections committee volunteer, Susan Rex, for a photo during the McCarl Coverlet Gallery open house, featuring a new textile collection acquired from the American Textile History Museum, held at the McCarl Gallery at Saint Vincent College in Unity Township on Wednesday, June 28, 2017.
Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
(from left), Curator, Lauren Churilla, joins collections committee volunteer, Susan Rex, for a photo during the McCarl Coverlet Gallery open house, featuring a new textile collection acquired from the American Textile History Museum, held at the McCarl Gallery at Saint Vincent College in Unity Township on Wednesday, June 28, 2017.
(from left), Linda Clogan and Frank Rex, admire the coverlets, during the McCarl Coverlet Gallery open house, featuring a new textile collection acquired from the American Textile History Museum, held at the McCarl Gallery at Saint Vincent College in Unity Township on Wednesday, June 28, 2017.
Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
(from left), Linda Clogan and Frank Rex, admire the coverlets, during the McCarl Coverlet Gallery open house, featuring a new textile collection acquired from the American Textile History Museum, held at the McCarl Gallery at Saint Vincent College in Unity Township on Wednesday, June 28, 2017.
Deborah Hart, of Latrobe, works on rug hooking at the Textile Makers Market, held during the McCarl Coverlet Gallery open house, featuring a new textile collection acquired from the American Textile History Museum, held at the McCarl Gallery at Saint Vincent College in Unity Township on Wednesday, June 28, 2017.
Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
Deborah Hart, of Latrobe, works on rug hooking at the Textile Makers Market, held during the McCarl Coverlet Gallery open house, featuring a new textile collection acquired from the American Textile History Museum, held at the McCarl Gallery at Saint Vincent College in Unity Township on Wednesday, June 28, 2017.
Latrobe natives, now of Poland, Maine, (from left), Fran and Maggie Holnaider, pose for a photo with Alisha Chaffey, ASA Enterprises business manager, at the Textile Makers Market, held during the McCarl Coverlet Gallery open house, featuring a new textile collection acquired from the American Textile History Museum, held at the McCarl Gallery at Saint Vincent College in Unity Township on Wednesday, June 28, 2017.
Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
Latrobe natives, now of Poland, Maine, (from left), Fran and Maggie Holnaider, pose for a photo with Alisha Chaffey, ASA Enterprises business manager, at the Textile Makers Market, held during the McCarl Coverlet Gallery open house, featuring a new textile collection acquired from the American Textile History Museum, held at the McCarl Gallery at Saint Vincent College in Unity Township on Wednesday, June 28, 2017.

As the collection grows at the Foster and Muriel McCarl Coverlet Gallery at St. Vincent College, so does the gallery's renown.

A June 28 open house to showcase a newly acquired collection from the recently closed American Textile History Museum in Lowell, Mass., drew visitors from far and wide.

Betty and Dale Graff, owners of Oak Noggin Bed and Breakfast in Jefferson Hills, Allegheny County, stopped by after a day wandering the Laurel Highlands. The couple's interest in early American arts and furnishings prompted their visit.

Fran and Maggie Holnaider were in the area from Maine. Fran is a Latrobe native, while his wife has an interest in weaving.

Gallery curator Lauren Churilla said that 25 of 301 coverlets acquired from the Massachusetts museum are displayed. Still to be delivered are looms, spinning wheels, a flax-scutching machine and other artifacts.

Also displayed at the open house were research materials on jacquard looms collected by Rita Androsko, curator emerita of the textile collection at the National Museum of American History at the Smithsonian Institution. The jacquard loom was invented by Joseph Marie Jacquard in France in 1804.

Open house guests listened to acoustic music by Mike Medved and browsed a market of textiles and crafts made by local artists.

Seen: Joni DelSordo, Sue Zyvith, Austin andMalinda Brighton, Dorothea Motto, Daryl McCafferty, gallery archivist Bryan Colvin and work study students Greg Bizup and Victoria Haas.

— Shirley McMarlin

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